Publications

    Madore A, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Project ECHO: Expanding the Capacity of Primary Care Providers to Address Complex Conditions. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case takes place in the United States (US) and traces the inception and growth of Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (Project ECHO)—a web-based "guided practice" model for primary care providers—from 2003 to 2016. After providing background on the US health system, including medical education, health care financing, and the supply and distribution of primary care and specialist providers, the case explores what motivated Project ECHO founder and liver specialist Sanjeev Arora, MD to train primary care providers in rural New Mexico in hepatitis C treatment and management. It describes early replication of the ECHO model in the US and across medical conditions and what the Project ECHO model entailed—including leveraging technology to expand access to specialty resources, best practices, case-based learning, and outcome monitoring, as well as good will among participants. A professional communications campaign, ongoing research, and persistence supported Project ECHO’s growth. The case displays three dimensions of Project ECHO’s early work: creating a new mode to redistribute the expertise of specialists to primary care practitioners, scaling this new care delivery model and measuring its impact, and identifying sustainable funding sources. The case concludes with the US Congress passing the ECHO Act to promote research on the model and Arora contemplating what else he might need to continue to scale to reach his goal of touching 1 billion lives.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing. 

    TeleECHO Clinic - hub and spoke
    TeleECHO Clinic. Source: Case writers.

    ECHO Institute
    ECHO Institute. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand what is needed to design a service model; the potential for redistribution of expertise among practitioners to enhance value; the role of operational effectiveness in enabling scale up; and the importance of measuring impact for stakeholders.

    Keywords: Public health, health care delivery, scale-up, resource-limited settings, human resource, information technology, primary care, information management, data collection, mentorship

    Sue K, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Addressing Tanzania’s Health Workforce Crisis Through a Public-Private Partnership: The Case of TTCIH. Harvard Business Publishing. 2016.Abstract

    Set in rural Tanzania, this case traces the founding and development of the Tanzanian Training Centre for International Health (TTCIH) from the early 2000s through 2015. It begins with an overview of the political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context of Tanzania, followed by a detailed description of the human resource for health crisis in Tanzania and the landscape of available health care training programs. The case then explores the origins and evolution of TTCIH, launched through a unique collaboration between private industry, a public health institute, local stakeholders and educators, and the Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare. It describes the evolution of TTCIH as leaders strive to make it self-sustaining and responsive to Tanzania’s health workforce crisis. The case highlights the challenges of successfully integrating corporate management practices and values into a global health program and the role of strategic leadership to sustain TTCIH.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013
    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenges of designing sustainable, high-quality health training institutions in low-resource settings; the training and resources needed to support task shifting and to address health workforce shortages in health care delivery; and, the importance of maintaining a sound strategy for medical education programs in the midst of changing national health needs and the evolving medical education landscape.

    Keywords: Global health, public health, health care delivery, education, government, value creation, Human Resources for Health, health care, nongovernmental organizations, Public-Private partnerships, learning, revenue growth, organizational effectiveness

     

    Madore A, Yousif H, Rosenberg J, Desmond C, Weintraub R. Political Leadership in South Africa: National Health Insurance. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of national health insurance (NHI) in South Africa under Minister of Health Aaron Motsoaledi. After providing background on health financing and health insurance policy in South Africa, the case explores Motsoaledi’s approach to realizing universal health coverage by establishing a government-administered NHI system and overhauling primary health care in the public sector. The case highlights the importance of strategic communication and stakeholder engagement in the highly political process of health system reform. It focuses on the complexity of the NHI policy process and the steps Motsoaledi and his team took to increase standards and accountability for public primary health care facilities. It concludes with the national health department rolling out new tools for monitoring facility progress and Motsoaledi awaiting approval of his team’s 19th draft plan for NHI, wondering what to do in the meantime to improve health care.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    National Department of Health, South Africa
    National Department of Health, South Africa (Source: Global Health Delivery case writers)

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the relationship between policy development, financing, and implementation of public health care delivery; the complexity of implementing standards and accountability for primary care infrastructure; and the work and negotiation needed to build consensus among private and public payers and providers with competing financial interests to generate greater value in health care delivery.

    Keywords: Political leadership, health system strengthening, stakeholder engagement, primary health care reform, policy development, politics and health care, health care financing, health insurance, strategy

     

    Wachter K, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Partners In Health in Neno District, Malawi. Harvard Business Publishing. 2013.Abstract

    Set in Neno District, Malawi from 2007–2012, the case focuses on the economic impact of investing in health care infrastructure. It examines management decisions that leaders of Abwenzi Pa Za Umoyo (APZU) and its founding organization—Partners In Health (PIH)—made as they supported the Government of Malawi in building a hospital and scaling up the delivery of APZU clinical and social programs across Neno district. The case highlights how a non-governmental organization can navigate the politics and local culture to improve Malawi’s health care system in close partnership with a strong, protocol-driven government. The case begins with Ophelia Dahl, co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health, reflecting on her December 2011 trip to Neno, nearly four years after her first visit. She observed signs of progress unrelated to health—bank branches had opened in town, a new road had been built, and the market had expanded dramatically. Ultimately, the case explores what this demonstrates about the value of her organization’s investments in health.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Neno rural hospital
    In the foreground: One-story original structures of Neno Rural Hospital used for outpatient and maternity services. In back: Two-story building constructed by APZU and partners used for inpatient wards, meetings, computer use, laboratory work, and government offices. Source: Keri Wachter, 2012.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the challenges of hiring and retaining local and expat staff, the complexity of an international NGO partnering with the government to improve health care, how leadership acumen and approaches impact scaling up and sustaining health care delivery, the relationship between the district hospital and the local economy, and how to assess impact beyond health measures.

    Keywords: Global health, social equality, project management, business and government relations, partnerships, strategy, economic development, health care policy, health care delivery, public health, human resource management, developing countries, innovation

    Sullivan E, ole-MoiYoi K, Weintraub R. Concept Note: The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This concept note explains the history, management, structure, financing, and strategy of the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria-a public-private partnership and international financing institution created to attract and disburse resources to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The note also provides some insight to its impact on grantees. Because the Global Fund plays an important role for many of the organizations featured in the Cases in Global Health Delivery Series, this note will be useful background reading for students engaging in those cases.

    Global Fund–Supported Program Results

    Global Fund–Supported Program Results. Source: Making a Difference, Global Fund 2011 Results Report. (Exhibit 3 from "Concept Note: The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.")

    Learning Objectives: To understand the structure, management, and role of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria as an international financing institution.

    Keywords: Structure, financing, tuberculosis and malaria, history, Global Fund to Fight Aids, strategy, management