Publications

    Cuneo CN, Rosenberg J, Madore A, Weintraub R. Improving Mental Health Services for Survivors of Sexual Violence in the DRC. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case explores the implementation and evaluation of mental health treatment for victims of conflict-related gender-based violence (GBV) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by the International Rescue Committee (IRC), a humanitarian organization based in New York City. Following the contextual background, the case traces the IRC’s work developing a psychosocial support program for GBV survivors starting in 2002. When the Applied Mental Health Research Group (AMHR) at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health evaluates the program in 2008, the IRC begins to consider the potential for its work to inform similar interventions. In 2011, the IRC team collaborated with AMHR to implement two concurrent randomized control trials (RCTs): one on the mental health effects of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and the other on the mental health and financial impact of a social and economic empowerment intervention called the Village Savings and Loans Association (VSLA). While the time and resources that went into completing the trials expanded the monitoring and evaluation capacity within the IRC and added important evidence to the lean body of global mental health literature, conducting the studies stretched the IRC’s local staff thin and required clarification of priorities and purpose. Had the RCTs had been worth it, and for whom? How could the study findings contribute to improving services for vulnerable populations in the region and beyond? 

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Theory of Change
    Source: Study of Effectiveness of a Social-Economic Intervention for Sexual Violence Survivors in Eastern DRC, November 2014.

    Theory of Change 2
    Source: Group Cognitive Processing Therapy: A Specialized Mental Health Intervention that Supports Improvements in Well-being for Sexual Violence Survivors. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, International Rescue Committee.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenge of meeting human resource needs to provide mental health care, the complexity of implementation and empirical study of mental health services, and the ethics and challenges of conducting randomized controlled trials in conflict settings.

    Keywords: public health, human resources, health care delivery, information management, mental health, scale-up, resource-limited settings, health care policy, data collection, public administration

    Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor. This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Postoperative recovery area
    Postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring at AIC Kijabe Hospital Surgical Facilities. Source: Case Writers.

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

    Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

    Talbot JR, Cole C, May M, Weintraub R. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) campaign in Nyanza Province, Kenya as it transformed from the subject of a randomized clinical trial into national policy. After providing some background on the cultural, political, and scientific context surrounding male circumcision, the case traces the PEPFAR-funded implementers' advances in delivering male circumcision in Nyanza. It examines the various delivery models used in Nyanza and the evolution of the relationship between implementers as well as on the development of the national strategic plan for VMMC released in 2009. The case ends with the implementers having come together successfully for two rapid, aggressive, 30-day implementation campaigns and the head of Kenya's National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Programme wrestling with how to make such campaigns sustainable and what lessons from the campaign to pass on to the national program. This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Mobile Service Delivery Model
    (A) Group counseling on male circumcision; (B) mobile circumcision counseling site; and (C) circumcision being conducted in tented delivery site. Source: Nyanza Reproductive Health Society.

    Learning Objectives: To understand how a randomized controlled trial may be translated into a large-scale public health program; how a surgical campaign was designed and implemented for rapid impact; the role of national and international collaboration in large-scale health delivery; and the ethical tradeoffs that arise in large-scale public health programs.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Keywords: Project management, AIDS, policy, supply and demand, partnerships, strategy, innovation

    Patel P, Enumah S, Chao T, et al. Concept Note: Global Surgery Care Delivery. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This concept note aims to describe the history of global surgery, the current landscape for providing surgical care in resource-limited settings, and future directions for research, funding, and advancement of global surgery.

    Learning Objectives: To further students’ and instructors’ understanding of surgery in the context of global health care delivery. This concept note supports the Cases in Global Health Delivery Collection, including Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya, The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan, Kenya’s Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Program

    Keywords: Global health, development of a field, surgical care delivery, history, surgery

    Rosenberg J, Madore A, Weintraub R. Concept Note: Implementing Universal Health Coverage: The Experience in Thailand, Ghana, Rwanda, and Vietnam. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This concept note aims to explore some of the basic principles underlying universal health care and their application in Thailand, Ghana, Rwanda, and Vietnam.

    UHC and Health Financing
    Relationship between UHC and Health Financing. Source: Kutzin, Joseph. Health financing for universal coverage and health system performance: concepts and implications for policy. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2013; 91: 602-611)

    Learning Objectives: To further students’ and instructors’ understanding of universal health coverage. This concept note supports teaching cases in the Global Health Delivery (GHD) Case Collection (e.g., GHD-030: Sin Taxes and Health Financing in the Philippines; GHD-032 Political Leadership in South Africa: National Health Insurance).

    Keywords: Policy design and implementation, political leadership, financing, health insurance, health equity, monitoring and evaluation, universal health coverage, quality of care

    Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Postoperative recovery area
    Postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring at AIC Kijabe Hospital Surgical Facilities. Source: Case Writers.

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

    Cole C, May M, Talbot JR, Weintraub R, Porter ME. The Avahan India AIDS Initiative: Managing Targeted HIV Prevention at Scale. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case is the second in a two-part series describing the Avahan Indian AIDS Initiative (Avahan), a large-scale HIV prevention delivery program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Gates Foundation). The case examines Avahan's choice of intervention strategies in the face of the HIV epidemic of India in 2002. It describes Avahan's structure, operations, and execution style, as well as how Avahan's management system for its seven "state lead partners" and 137 district-level nongovernmental organizations was applied initially to scale and later to sustain the delivery model. The case ends with Avahan's director planning to transfer program ownership to the Government of India.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Examples of Microplanning Tools Developed by Avahan SLPs
    Examples of Microplanning Tools Developed by Avahan SLPs. Source: Created by case writers. (Exhibit 10 "The Avahan India AIDS Initiative: Managing Targeted HIV Prevention at Scale" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the strategies needed to deliver HIV prevention services at scale; how the configuration of management activities can enable rapid scale up of HIV prevention programming; and how these management activities must evolve to sustain delivery at scale.

    Keywords: Management and operations, HIV prevention, transferring large-scale programs to government ownership, scaling up, sustainability, strategy

    Talbot JR, Bohrer M, Rhatigan J. Iran’s Triangular Clinic. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development and implementation of Iran’s Triangular Clinic, an innovative health care delivery program, from its beginning as a site for counseling HIV-infected individuals to an integrated facility offering comprehensive HIV, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and drug addiction treatment, care, and support. The case examines the need for such services among the marginalized population that the first clinic served within the historical, political, economic, and health context of Iran and, specifically, in Kermanshah province, where the project begins. The case raises the question of how the clinic model might be integrated into primary health care and replicated throughout the country as part of the Iranian Ministry of Health’s Integrated Health Program.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Triangular clinic model
    Triangular clinic model. Source: World Health Organization and Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Best Practice in HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care for Drug Abusers: The Triangular Clinic in Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran 2004, WHO: Cairo.

    Learning Objectives: To examine how health care delivery organizations can configure their services to deliver high value health care to the populations they serve and to understand methods to engage marginalized populations in order to increase their access to and demand for health services.

    Supporting Content: The sequel to this case is titled Scaling up Iran's Triangular Clinic.

    Keywords: Marginalized populations, comprehensive HIV prevention, harm reduction

     

    Kleinman S, Talbot JR, Harris J, Ellner A. The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) of Uganda. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of The AIDS Support Organization (TASO), a Ugandan non-governmental organization, from 2001 to 2006. One of the first organizations to become involved in HIV/AIDS in the late 1980s, TASO began as a meeting place for people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, helping people to live positively. The organization provided free counselling, social support, limited medical care, community mobilizing, advocacy and networking. TASO worked alongside government facilities and trained government medical personnel in HIV counselling. After many years, TASO got a new director who brought management skills, a commitment to professionalizing the organization, and a drive to expand services. TASO began incorporating antiretroviral therapy (ART) into its offerings. The ART delivery model combined home and clinic-based care in order to maximize patient adherence. The case follows the development of the organization and scale up of services and raises the question of how to deliver care most cost effectively while maintaining its values and meeting the changing needs of the population and clients.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO
    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO

    Learning Objectives: Students should learn how a healthcare delivery organization can expand and evolve over time in response to changes in external context and the needs of its clients; how public and private organizations can coordinate to meet the varied needs of a population; and the importance of leadership, management, and strategic vision in creating successful global health programs.

    Keywords: Service expansion, Home- and clinic-based care, HIV prevention and treatment.