Publications

    Donovan C, Rosenberg J, Madore A, Weintraub R. Maternal and Child Health in Uttar Pradesh, India: A Mother's Story. Harvard Business Publishing. 2018.Abstract

    Set in India’s most populous state, Uttar Pradesh, this case explores the complexity of addressing maternal and child health and care delivery by looking at health-related behaviors and decision making from the perspective of a mother. The case is intended to be used in conjunction with GHD-039 (Working as an ASHA to Improve Maternal and Child Health in Uttar Pradesh, India) and GHD-040 (Improving Maternal and Child Health Outcomes in Uttar Pradesh, India).

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Khairabad Community Health CenterLearning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the decisions facing frontline providers and their beneficiaries, and the numerous factors that influence their choices; how households prioritize health among other needs; and the complexity of aligning health programs with beneficiary needs, cultural context, household dynamics, and other factors to impact health behaviors and outcomes.

    Keywords: public health, consumers, health care delivery, maternal and child health, consumer behavior, behavioral economics, resource-limited settings, health care policy, data collection, decision making

     

    Instructor's Guide. The Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard University. 2018.Abstract
    The instructor's guide explains the educational concepts presented in the cases and the conceptual framework underlying the collection, as well as how to use GHD materials in the classroom. Updated March 2018.
     
    Donovan C, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Concept Note: Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. Harvard Business Publishing. 2018.Abstract

    This concept note aims to describe the history of reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH), the current landscape for providing RMNCH care in resource-limited settings, and future directions for research, funding, and advancement of the field. 

    Key indicators by region
    Key indicators by region. Source: The US Government and Global Maternal & Child Health Efforts. Kaiser Family Foundation. June 20, 2016.

    Learning objectives: This concept note aims to further students’ and instructors’ understanding of RMNCH presented in the Cases in Global Health Delivery collection.

    Keywords: Maternal health, morbidity and mortality, advocacy, service delivery, workforce development, demographic segmentation

    Ballard M, Madore A, Johnson A, et al. Concept Note: Community Health Workers. Harvard Business Publishing. 2018.Abstract

    Community health workers (CHWs)—lay people who engage in efforts to improve the health of their communities—have been proposed as a way to fill the global health human resource gap by extending services to hard-to-reach populations in remote areas. This concept note provides a brief history of CHWs, considers issues in CHW program design, and outlines future directions for research and funding.

    Visual Representation of CHW Density in Sub-Saharan Africa
    Visual representation of CHW density in Sub-Saharan Africa. Source: One Million CHWs Campaign, 2016.

    Learning objectives: This concept note aims to further students’ and instructors’ understanding of community health workers presented in the Cases in Global Health Delivery collection.

    Keywords: Human resources, primary care, disease management, monitoring and evaluation, resource allocation, global health policy, community health workers, partnerships

    Note: In map legend, 2,000–4,9999 should read 2,000–4,999.

    Cuneo CN, Rosenberg J, Madore A, Weintraub R. Improving Mental Health Services for Survivors of Sexual Violence in the DRC. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case explores the implementation and evaluation of mental health treatment for victims of conflict-related gender-based violence (GBV) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by the International Rescue Committee (IRC), a humanitarian organization based in New York City. Following the contextual background, the case traces the IRC’s work developing a psychosocial support program for GBV survivors starting in 2002. When the Applied Mental Health Research Group (AMHR) at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health evaluates the program in 2008, the IRC begins to consider the potential for its work to inform similar interventions. In 2011, the IRC team collaborated with AMHR to implement two concurrent randomized control trials (RCTs): one on the mental health effects of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and the other on the mental health and financial impact of a social and economic empowerment intervention called the Village Savings and Loans Association (VSLA). While the time and resources that went into completing the trials expanded the monitoring and evaluation capacity within the IRC and added important evidence to the lean body of global mental health literature, conducting the studies stretched the IRC’s local staff thin and required clarification of priorities and purpose. Had the RCTs had been worth it, and for whom? How could the study findings contribute to improving services for vulnerable populations in the region and beyond? 

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Theory of Change
    Source: Study of Effectiveness of a Social-Economic Intervention for Sexual Violence Survivors in Eastern DRC, November 2014.

    Theory of Change 2
    Source: Group Cognitive Processing Therapy: A Specialized Mental Health Intervention that Supports Improvements in Well-being for Sexual Violence Survivors. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, International Rescue Committee.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenge of meeting human resource needs to provide mental health care, the complexity of implementation and empirical study of mental health services, and the ethics and challenges of conducting randomized controlled trials in conflict settings.

    Keywords: public health, human resources, health care delivery, information management, mental health, scale-up, resource-limited settings, health care policy, data collection, public administration

    Hashimoto K, Rhatigan J. Chagas Disease Vector Control in Honduras. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case describes how the Honduran Ministry of Health developed and implemented a Chagas disease control program with the assistance of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and others from 2003 to 2012. After providing background information about Honduras and Chagas disease, the case examines the work of the Guatemalan Ministry of Health and JICA to implement a Chagas disease control program that provided the template for the program in Honduras. The case then describes the adaptation of this model for the Honduran context, including details of the surveillance model and vector control interventions. The case concludes with the program considering how it would maintain its success in spite of decreased funding and changes in leadership.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Chagas vector chart
    Main vector species of Chagas disease in Central America. Source: Biblioteca Virtual en Salud de Honduras.

    Indoor residual spraying
    Training community members for indoor residual spraying in the first trial in Intibucá 2004. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate strategies in control of neglected tropical diseases; Chagas disease vector control and surveillance; the role of bilateral cooperation to strengthen health systems management; and how regional disease control initiatives are implemented locally.

    Keywords: Information management, scale-up, health care policy, public administration, government policy, resource-limited settings, data-collection

    Madore A, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Project ECHO: Expanding the Capacity of Primary Care Providers to Address Complex Conditions. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case takes place in the United States (US) and traces the inception and growth of Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (Project ECHO)—a web-based "guided practice" model for primary care providers—from 2003 to 2016. After providing background on the US health system, including medical education, health care financing, and the supply and distribution of primary care and specialist providers, the case explores what motivated Project ECHO founder and liver specialist Sanjeev Arora, MD to train primary care providers in rural New Mexico in hepatitis C treatment and management. It describes early replication of the ECHO model in the US and across medical conditions and what the Project ECHO model entailed—including leveraging technology to expand access to specialty resources, best practices, case-based learning, and outcome monitoring, as well as good will among participants. A professional communications campaign, ongoing research, and persistence supported Project ECHO’s growth. The case displays three dimensions of Project ECHO’s early work: creating a new mode to redistribute the expertise of specialists to primary care practitioners, scaling this new care delivery model and measuring its impact, and identifying sustainable funding sources. The case concludes with the US Congress passing the ECHO Act to promote research on the model and Arora contemplating what else he might need to continue to scale to reach his goal of touching 1 billion lives.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing. 

    TeleECHO Clinic - hub and spoke
    TeleECHO Clinic. Source: Case writers.

    ECHO Institute
    ECHO Institute. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand what is needed to design a service model; the potential for redistribution of expertise among practitioners to enhance value; the role of operational effectiveness in enabling scale up; and the importance of measuring impact for stakeholders.

    Keywords: Public health, health care delivery, scale-up, resource-limited settings, human resource, information technology, primary care, information management, data collection, mentorship

    Rosenberg J, ole-MoiYoi K, Morse M. Concept Note: Clinical Background on HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis. Harvard Business Publishing. 2016.Abstract

    This concept note provides a clinical overview of three diseases that feature predominantly in our case study collection: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The concept note describes the pathology, causes, and management related to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of each of the diseases.

    Learning Objectives: To further students’ and instructors’ understanding of clinical concepts presented in the Global Health Delivery (GHD) Case Collection.

    Keyword: Epidemiology, pathology, disease management, monitoring and evaluation, resource allocation, global health policy, partnerships, reatment and prevention.

    Brooks P, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. The Global Trachoma Mapping Project. Harvard Business Publishing. 2016.Abstract

    This case explores what it took to map the prevalence of trachoma infection in 1,531 districts across 26 countries by directly examining 2.39 million individuals in just three years. Dozens of organizations worked together on the largest standardized mapping project in the world as part of an effort to eliminate blinding trachoma globally by the year 2020. After providing some background on trachoma, early control efforts, and the formation of a global coalition, the case explores the events, strategies, technology, and stakeholders that enabled the mapping project. It describes how the stakeholders worked together, the coordination and management mechanisms used, and the investments required. Given that disease elimination had been achieved only once before, in the case of smallpox, the case asks students to consider how the project’s leaders, Tom Millar and Anthony Solomon, could help maximize returns from trachoma mapping so that the campaign could achieve its ultimate goal of global trachoma elimination within the next five years. Were there ways in which they could leverage efforts to map this neglected tropical disease to inform other disease control programs?

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Life cycle of Trachoma
    Life Cycle of Trachoma. Source: The Carter Center/Al Granberg, International Trachoma Initiative. Available at http://www.neglecteddiseases.gov/target_diseases/trachoma/.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate what contributes to the development of a productive coalition; what it takes to collect quality data at scale; the challenges and benefits of identifying your target population for public health programming; and the tradeoffs between a targeted campaign addressing one disease and bundling efforts for multiple diseases.

    Keywords: Disease mapping, disease elimination, multi-sectoral collaboration, electronic data capture

     

    Sue K, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Addressing Tanzania’s Health Workforce Crisis Through a Public-Private Partnership: The Case of TTCIH. Harvard Business Publishing. 2016.Abstract

    Set in rural Tanzania, this case traces the founding and development of the Tanzanian Training Centre for International Health (TTCIH) from the early 2000s through 2015. It begins with an overview of the political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context of Tanzania, followed by a detailed description of the human resource for health crisis in Tanzania and the landscape of available health care training programs. The case then explores the origins and evolution of TTCIH, launched through a unique collaboration between private industry, a public health institute, local stakeholders and educators, and the Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare. It describes the evolution of TTCIH as leaders strive to make it self-sustaining and responsive to Tanzania’s health workforce crisis. The case highlights the challenges of successfully integrating corporate management practices and values into a global health program and the role of strategic leadership to sustain TTCIH.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013
    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenges of designing sustainable, high-quality health training institutions in low-resource settings; the training and resources needed to support task shifting and to address health workforce shortages in health care delivery; and, the importance of maintaining a sound strategy for medical education programs in the midst of changing national health needs and the evolving medical education landscape.

    Keywords: Global health, public health, health care delivery, education, government, value creation, Human Resources for Health, health care, nongovernmental organizations, Public-Private partnerships, learning, revenue growth, organizational effectiveness

     

    Arnquist S, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. The Indus Hospital: Building Surgical Capacity in Pakistan (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    Set in Karachi, Pakistan, this case examines a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting. Within Pakistan's health care system and its political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context, the case focuses on the Indus Hospital, a charity hospital started in 2007. The case explores the effect of financing, leadership, and a mission-driven culture on health care delivery and the hospital's efforts to provide high-quality care for free to poor patients. It concludes with Indus' leaders planning how to expand their service delivery to include primary and preventative care. This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic
    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic. Pakistani architect Tariq Quaiser designed the Indus Hospital’s open-air TB clinic with a specialized design that optimized natural ventilation for increased airflow that effectively minimized the spread of disease. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting, how private financing impacts health care delivery, and the impact of leadership on health care delivery.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan.

    Keywords: Human rights, workforce management, sustainability, role of civil society, information systems, organizational culture

    Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor. This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Postoperative recovery area
    Postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring at AIC Kijabe Hospital Surgical Facilities. Source: Case Writers.

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

    Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

    Talbot JR, Cole C, May M, Weintraub R. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) campaign in Nyanza Province, Kenya as it transformed from the subject of a randomized clinical trial into national policy. After providing some background on the cultural, political, and scientific context surrounding male circumcision, the case traces the PEPFAR-funded implementers' advances in delivering male circumcision in Nyanza. It examines the various delivery models used in Nyanza and the evolution of the relationship between implementers as well as on the development of the national strategic plan for VMMC released in 2009. The case ends with the implementers having come together successfully for two rapid, aggressive, 30-day implementation campaigns and the head of Kenya's National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Programme wrestling with how to make such campaigns sustainable and what lessons from the campaign to pass on to the national program. This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Mobile Service Delivery Model
    (A) Group counseling on male circumcision; (B) mobile circumcision counseling site; and (C) circumcision being conducted in tented delivery site. Source: Nyanza Reproductive Health Society.

    Learning Objectives: To understand how a randomized controlled trial may be translated into a large-scale public health program; how a surgical campaign was designed and implemented for rapid impact; the role of national and international collaboration in large-scale health delivery; and the ethical tradeoffs that arise in large-scale public health programs.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Keywords: Project management, AIDS, policy, supply and demand, partnerships, strategy, innovation

    Rosenberg J, Wachter K, Weintraub R. Concept Note: Malnutrition. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This concept note provides an overview of malnutrition, including its definition, causes, and management related to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. It also describes the state of global malnutrition, including national and international efforts to reduce malnutrition and the stakeholders involved.

    Learning Objectives: To further students’ and instructors’ understanding of malnutrition-related concepts presented in the Global Health Delivery (GHD) Case Collection (e.g., GHD-031: Reducing Child Malnutrition in Maharashtra, India).

    Keywords: Maternal and child health, children, intergenerational disease, public-private partnership, nutrition, strategy, political leadership, scale-up, community health workers, health care delivery, malnutrition, cross-sector collaboration

    Patel P, Enumah S, Chao T, et al. Concept Note: Global Surgery Care Delivery. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This concept note aims to describe the history of global surgery, the current landscape for providing surgical care in resource-limited settings, and future directions for research, funding, and advancement of global surgery.

    Learning Objectives: To further students’ and instructors’ understanding of surgery in the context of global health care delivery. This concept note supports the Cases in Global Health Delivery Collection, including Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya, The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan, Kenya’s Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Program

    Keywords: Global health, development of a field, surgical care delivery, history, surgery

    Rosenberg J, Madore A, Weintraub R. Concept Note: Implementing Universal Health Coverage: The Experience in Thailand, Ghana, Rwanda, and Vietnam. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This concept note aims to explore some of the basic principles underlying universal health care and their application in Thailand, Ghana, Rwanda, and Vietnam.

    UHC and Health Financing
    Relationship between UHC and Health Financing. Source: Kutzin, Joseph. Health financing for universal coverage and health system performance: concepts and implications for policy. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2013; 91: 602-611)

    Learning Objectives: To further students’ and instructors’ understanding of universal health coverage. This concept note supports teaching cases in the Global Health Delivery (GHD) Case Collection (e.g., GHD-030: Sin Taxes and Health Financing in the Philippines; GHD-032 Political Leadership in South Africa: National Health Insurance).

    Keywords: Policy design and implementation, political leadership, financing, health insurance, health equity, monitoring and evaluation, universal health coverage, quality of care

    Wachter K, Rosenberg J, Singal R, Weintraub R. Reducing Child Malnutrition in Maharashtra, India. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case demonstrates what it takes to address a chronic, intergenerational public health issue. It explores the drivers behind the reduction of malnutrition in Maharashtra State, India, from 2001–2013. Specifically, the case examines the strategies and management decisions of leaders of the government-established Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission as they worked to reduce the incidence of malnutrition in children and women through a multi-sectoral collaborative approach.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Stunting Syndrome from Conception through Adulthood
    Stunting Syndrome from Conception through Adulthood. Dark blue denotes the period between conception and 2 years (‘the first 1000 days’) when interventions are most effective. Light blue denotes the time period between 2 years and mid-childhood and during the adolescent growth spurt when some catch-up in linear growth may occur. The light blue period before Conceptus reflects evidence that dietary interventions targeting stunted women pre-conception improve birth outcomes. Gray denotes periods when the stunting syndrome appears unresponsive to interventions. Dashed line–a stunted child whose environment becomes more affluent with abundant access to food, causing excessive weight gain; solid line–a stunted child whose environment remains resource-constrained/food insecure. Source: Adapted by case writers with assistance from Isabelle Celentano from Pendergast AJ, Humphrey JH. “The stunting syndrome in developing countries,” Paediatr Int Child Health. 2014;34(4):250-265; doi:10.1179/2046905514Y.0000000158.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate how to configure specific interventions and indicators to ameliorate and measure malnutrition for a local setting; the complexity and importance of crafting policies and generating political will across sectors in support of nutrition programs; and the role of a strong community workforce in enabling nutrition programs to reach the target population.

    Keywords: Maternal and child health, children, intergenerational disease, public-private partnership, nutrition, strategy, political leadership, scale-up, community health workers, health care delivery, malnutrition, cross-sector collaboration

    Madore A, Yousif H, Rosenberg J, Desmond C, Weintraub R. Political Leadership in South Africa: National Health Insurance. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of national health insurance (NHI) in South Africa under Minister of Health Aaron Motsoaledi. After providing background on health financing and health insurance policy in South Africa, the case explores Motsoaledi’s approach to realizing universal health coverage by establishing a government-administered NHI system and overhauling primary health care in the public sector. The case highlights the importance of strategic communication and stakeholder engagement in the highly political process of health system reform. It focuses on the complexity of the NHI policy process and the steps Motsoaledi and his team took to increase standards and accountability for public primary health care facilities. It concludes with the national health department rolling out new tools for monitoring facility progress and Motsoaledi awaiting approval of his team’s 19th draft plan for NHI, wondering what to do in the meantime to improve health care.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    National Department of Health, South Africa
    National Department of Health, South Africa (Source: Global Health Delivery case writers)

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the relationship between policy development, financing, and implementation of public health care delivery; the complexity of implementing standards and accountability for primary care infrastructure; and the work and negotiation needed to build consensus among private and public payers and providers with competing financial interests to generate greater value in health care delivery.

    Keywords: Political leadership, health system strengthening, stakeholder engagement, primary health care reform, policy development, politics and health care, health care financing, health insurance, strategy

     

    Madore A, Yousif H, Rosenberg J, Desmond C, Weintraub R. Political Leadership in South Africa: HIV. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case describes the rapid scale-up of South Africa’s national HIV/AIDS response from 2009 until 2015. After providing background on apartheid, the impact of HIV/AIDS denialism, and an overview of the health system in South Africa, the case follows Minster of Health Aaron Motsoaledi’s leadership of the national department of health’s HIV/AIDS program. The response included four key components: a countrywide counseling and testing campaign, capacity building to increase access to treatment, an overhaul of the ARV bidding and procurement processes, and promotion of voluntary male medical circumcision. The case highlights how Motsoaledi and his team leveraged expertise and resources from domestic and international organizations to support ambitious testing and treatment goals. It focuses on Motsoaledi’s communication strategies and the factors that influenced his planning and implementation decisions. The case ends with Motsoaledi considering how to advance the national HIV/AIDS program amid larger health system issues, including overcrowding and limited monitoring capacity.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Promotion of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV
    Promotion of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (source: Global Health Delivery Project case writers)

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate how politics can shape the trajectory of an epidemic; the importance of leveraging existing resources to scale services in a public health system; the challenges of transitioning from an emergency response to a sustainable public program; and the competing interests of a vertical intervention program and the complex health system within which it operates.

    Keywords: Political leadership, data and health policy, counseling and testing, adherence, advocacy, HIV treatment, health care delivery, cross-sector collaboration, vertical programs, value creation, drug procurement, civil society, strategy

     

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