Publications

    Sue K, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Addressing Tanzania’s Health Workforce Crisis Through a Public-Private Partnership: The Case of TTCIH. Harvard Business Publishing. 2016.Abstract

    Set in rural Tanzania, this case traces the founding and development of the Tanzanian Training Centre for International Health (TTCIH) from the early 2000s through 2015. It begins with an overview of the political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context of Tanzania, followed by a detailed description of the human resource for health crisis in Tanzania and the landscape of available health care training programs. The case then explores the origins and evolution of TTCIH, launched through a unique collaboration between private industry, a public health institute, local stakeholders and educators, and the Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare. It describes the evolution of TTCIH as leaders strive to make it self-sustaining and responsive to Tanzania’s health workforce crisis. The case highlights the challenges of successfully integrating corporate management practices and values into a global health program and the role of strategic leadership to sustain TTCIH.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013
    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenges of designing sustainable, high-quality health training institutions in low-resource settings; the training and resources needed to support task shifting and to address health workforce shortages in health care delivery; and, the importance of maintaining a sound strategy for medical education programs in the midst of changing national health needs and the evolving medical education landscape.

    Keywords: Global health, public health, health care delivery, education, government, value creation, Human Resources for Health, health care, nongovernmental organizations, Public-Private partnerships, learning, revenue growth, organizational effectiveness

     

    Kleinman S, Rosenberg J, Harris J, Ellner A. The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) of Uganda. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of The AIDS Support Organization (TASO), a Ugandan non-governmental organization, from 2001 to 2006. One of the first organizations to become involved in HIV/AIDS in the late 1980s, TASO began as a meeting place for people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, helping people to live positively. The organization provided free counselling, social support, limited medical care, community mobilizing, advocacy and networking. TASO worked alongside government facilities and trained government medical personnel in HIV counselling. After many years, TASO got a new director who brought management skills, a commitment to professionalizing the organization, and a drive to expand services. TASO began incorporating antiretroviral therapy (ART) into its offerings. The ART delivery model combined home and clinic-based care in order to maximize patient adherence. The case follows the development of the organization and scale up of services and raises the question of how to deliver care most cost effectively while maintaining its values and meeting the changing needs of the population and clients.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO
    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO

    Learning Objectives: Students should learn how a healthcare delivery organization can expand and evolve over time in response to changes in external context and the needs of its clients; how public and private organizations can coordinate to meet the varied needs of a population; and the importance of leadership, management, and strategic vision in creating successful global health programs.

    Keywords: Service expansion, Home- and clinic-based care, HIV prevention and treatment.