Publications

    Madore A, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Project ECHO: Expanding the Capacity of Primary Care Providers to Address Complex Conditions. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case takes place in the United States (US) and traces the inception and growth of Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (Project ECHO)—a web-based "guided practice" model for primary care providers—from 2003 to 2016. After providing background on the US health system, including medical education, health care financing, and the supply and distribution of primary care and specialist providers, the case explores what motivated Project ECHO founder and liver specialist Sanjeev Arora, MD to train primary care providers in rural New Mexico in hepatitis C treatment and management. It describes early replication of the ECHO model in the US and across medical conditions and what the Project ECHO model entailed—including leveraging technology to expand access to specialty resources, best practices, case-based learning, and outcome monitoring, as well as good will among participants. A professional communications campaign, ongoing research, and persistence supported Project ECHO’s growth. The case displays three dimensions of Project ECHO’s early work: creating a new mode to redistribute the expertise of specialists to primary care practitioners, scaling this new care delivery model and measuring its impact, and identifying sustainable funding sources. The case concludes with the US Congress passing the ECHO Act to promote research on the model and Arora contemplating what else he might need to continue to scale to reach his goal of touching 1 billion lives.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing. 

    TeleECHO Clinic - hub and spoke
    TeleECHO Clinic. Source: Case writers.

    ECHO Institute
    ECHO Institute. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand what is needed to design a service model; the potential for redistribution of expertise among practitioners to enhance value; the role of operational effectiveness in enabling scale up; and the importance of measuring impact for stakeholders.

    Keywords: Public health, health care delivery, scale-up, resource-limited settings, human resource, information technology, primary care, information management, data collection, mentorship

    Arnquist S, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. The Indus Hospital: Building Surgical Capacity in Pakistan (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    Set in Karachi, Pakistan, this case examines a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting. Within Pakistan's health care system and its political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context, the case focuses on the Indus Hospital, a charity hospital started in 2007. The case explores the effect of financing, leadership, and a mission-driven culture on health care delivery and the hospital's efforts to provide high-quality care for free to poor patients. It concludes with Indus' leaders planning how to expand their service delivery to include primary and preventative care. This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic
    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic. Pakistani architect Tariq Quaiser designed the Indus Hospital’s open-air TB clinic with a specialized design that optimized natural ventilation for increased airflow that effectively minimized the spread of disease. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting, how private financing impacts health care delivery, and the impact of leadership on health care delivery.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan.

    Keywords: Human rights, workforce management, sustainability, role of civil society, information systems, organizational culture

    Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor. This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Postoperative recovery area
    Postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring at AIC Kijabe Hospital Surgical Facilities. Source: Case Writers.

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

    Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

    Talbot JR, Cole C, May M, Weintraub R. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) campaign in Nyanza Province, Kenya as it transformed from the subject of a randomized clinical trial into national policy. After providing some background on the cultural, political, and scientific context surrounding male circumcision, the case traces the PEPFAR-funded implementers' advances in delivering male circumcision in Nyanza. It examines the various delivery models used in Nyanza and the evolution of the relationship between implementers as well as on the development of the national strategic plan for VMMC released in 2009. The case ends with the implementers having come together successfully for two rapid, aggressive, 30-day implementation campaigns and the head of Kenya's National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Programme wrestling with how to make such campaigns sustainable and what lessons from the campaign to pass on to the national program. This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Mobile Service Delivery Model
    (A) Group counseling on male circumcision; (B) mobile circumcision counseling site; and (C) circumcision being conducted in tented delivery site. Source: Nyanza Reproductive Health Society.

    Learning Objectives: To understand how a randomized controlled trial may be translated into a large-scale public health program; how a surgical campaign was designed and implemented for rapid impact; the role of national and international collaboration in large-scale health delivery; and the ethical tradeoffs that arise in large-scale public health programs.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

    Keywords: Project management, AIDS, policy, supply and demand, partnerships, strategy, innovation

    Wachter K, Rosenberg J, Singal R, Weintraub R. Reducing Child Malnutrition in Maharashtra, India. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case demonstrates what it takes to address a chronic, intergenerational public health issue. It explores the drivers behind the reduction of malnutrition in Maharashtra State, India, from 2001–2013. Specifically, the case examines the strategies and management decisions of leaders of the government-established Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission as they worked to reduce the incidence of malnutrition in children and women through a multi-sectoral collaborative approach.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Stunting Syndrome from Conception through Adulthood
    Stunting Syndrome from Conception through Adulthood. Dark blue denotes the period between conception and 2 years (‘the first 1000 days’) when interventions are most effective. Light blue denotes the time period between 2 years and mid-childhood and during the adolescent growth spurt when some catch-up in linear growth may occur. The light blue period before Conceptus reflects evidence that dietary interventions targeting stunted women pre-conception improve birth outcomes. Gray denotes periods when the stunting syndrome appears unresponsive to interventions. Dashed line–a stunted child whose environment becomes more affluent with abundant access to food, causing excessive weight gain; solid line–a stunted child whose environment remains resource-constrained/food insecure. Source: Adapted by case writers with assistance from Isabelle Celentano from Pendergast AJ, Humphrey JH. “The stunting syndrome in developing countries,” Paediatr Int Child Health. 2014;34(4):250-265; doi:10.1179/2046905514Y.0000000158.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate how to configure specific interventions and indicators to ameliorate and measure malnutrition for a local setting; the complexity and importance of crafting policies and generating political will across sectors in support of nutrition programs; and the role of a strong community workforce in enabling nutrition programs to reach the target population.

    Keywords: Maternal and child health, children, intergenerational disease, public-private partnership, nutrition, strategy, political leadership, scale-up, community health workers, health care delivery, malnutrition, cross-sector collaboration

    Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Postoperative recovery area
    Postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring at AIC Kijabe Hospital Surgical Facilities. Source: Case Writers.

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    Set in Karachi, Pakistan, this case examines a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting. Within Pakistan's health care system and its political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context, the case focuses on the Indus Hospital, a charity hospital started in 2007. The case explores the effect of financing, leadership, and a mission-driven culture on health care delivery and the hospital's efforts to provide high-quality care for free to poor patients. It concludes with Indus' leaders planning how to expand their service delivery to include primary and preventative care.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic
    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic. Pakistani architect Tariq Quaiser designed the Indus Hospital’s open-air TB clinic with a specialized design that optimized natural ventilation for increased airflow that effectively minimized the spread of disease. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting, how private financing impacts health care delivery, and the impact of leadership on health care delivery.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled The Indus Hospital: Building Surgical Capacity in Pakistan (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Human rights, workforce management, sustainability, role of civil society, information systems, organizational culture

    ole-MoiYoi K, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Roll-Out of Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Malaria in Swaziland. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    After outlining the history of malaria in Swaziland, this focused case study examines the implementation of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria in Swaziland to improve case management and to strengthen the national malaria surveillance system as the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) aims to implement a national elimination strategy. In addition to information on RDT selection, the case details Swaziland's quality assurance program-the first of its kind in the region, the public health benefits of the immediate disease notification system for active case detection, and Simon Kunene's leadership qualities as the manager of the NMCP for 24 years. The case addresses the necessary increases in financing and human resources to support the strategy and evaluates the impact of RDTs on the strategy. Challenges the NMCP faces in achieving malaria elimination include sustaining political will, interest, and financial commitments from donors and strengthening health workforce training and RDT procurement and distribution.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Milestones toward Malaria Elimination
    Milestones toward Malaria Elimination. Source: The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world. Roll Back Malaria Partnership, 2008. (Exhibit 4 from "Roll-Out of Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Malaria in Swaziland" case.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the role of diagnostics in a malaria elimination strategy, what it takes to effectively integrate a new diagnostic into care delivery, how leaders generate social and political capital over time, and the intricacies of managing a national disease program.

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, diagnostic testing strategies, malaria eradication and control

    Arnquist S, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. loveLife: Transitions After 2005. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case focuses on how loveLife, South Africa's largest youth-focused nongovernmental organization, recovered from losing one-third of its operating revenues in 2006 when the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria chose not to renew funding to South Africa. The case describes managers' decisions to downsize and secure additional government funding to save the organization and the ways in which the original strategy guided these changes. The case ends in 2009 with loveLife's new chief executive officer contemplating how to secure the organization's future amid national political changes and funding challenges.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    loveLife Program Coverage, 2007. Source: loveLife
    loveLife Program Coverage, 2007. Source: loveLife. (Exhibit 6 from "loveLife: Transitions After 2005" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To appreciate how crises can impact program management and activities, the role of leadership in responding to crises, the benefits of second generation leadership for an organization, and the implications of transitioning from international funding sources to domestic government funding sources.

    Supporting Content: This case is a sequel to loveLife: Preventing HIV Among South African Youth.

    Keywords: National strategy, impact of financing, HIV prevention, leadership, sustainability

    Madore A, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Electronic Medical Records at ISS Clinic Mbarara, Uganda. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case traces the evolution of the medical records system at the Immune Suppression Syndrome (ISS) Clinic in Mbarara, Uganda. After providing some background on Uganda, its HIV epidemic, and the general rise of electronic medical records and software, it explains the history of the ISS Clinic and its service delivery model. ISS Clinic had used paper records to manage care, treatment, and reporting needs until it partnered with the University of California, San Francisco on research initiatives. In 2004 ISS Clinic became a global health initiative beneficiary and the outpatient antiretroviral therapy center of Mbarara Regional Hospital. Offering free treatment, patient enrollment jumped dramatically. The clinic's electronic Access database was unable to keep up. The clinic secured a grant to implement a new medical record system, and leaders struggled to convince the physicians and other stakeholders of its value. The most clinically-relevant pieces were slow to be put in place, and new Ministry of Health regulations posed minor setbacks. At the end of 2010, the clinic had seen nearly 21,000 patients. Clinic research had contributed to more than 20 peer-reviewed articles, but the long-term prospects for the database were unknown.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Screenshot of an Electronic Form in OpenMRS, ISS Clinic
    Screenshot of an Electronic Form in OpenMRS, ISS Clinic. Source: ISS Clinic. (Exhibit 12 from "Electronic Medical Records at ISS Clinic Mbarara, Uganda" case.)

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the evolution of medical records at an HIV/AIDS clinic in a resource-limited setting. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate what it takes to collect and systemize accurate health data for patient care and research, what it takes to implement an electronic medical system in a resource-limited setting, and the relationship between a health record system, clinical care, and public health.

    Keywords: Management and operations, HIV treatment, health research, health information systems

     

    Talbot JR, Cole C, May M, Weintraub R. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) campaign in Nyanza Province, Kenya as it transformed from the subject of a randomized clinical trial into national policy. After providing some background on the cultural, political, and scientific context surrounding male circumcision, the case traces the PEPFAR-funded implementers' advances in delivering male circumcision in Nyanza. It examines the various delivery models used in Nyanza and the evolution of the relationship between implementers as well as on the development of the national strategic plan for VMMC released in 2009. The case ends with the implementers having come together successfully for two rapid, aggressive, 30-day implementation campaigns and the head of Kenya's National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Programme wrestling with how to make such campaigns sustainable and what lessons from the campaign to pass on to the national program.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Mobile Service Delivery Model
    (A) Group counseling on male circumcision; (B) mobile circumcision counseling site; and (C) circumcision being conducted in tented delivery site. Source: Nyanza Reproductive Health Society.

    Learning Objectives: To understand how a randomized controlled trial may be translated into a large-scale public health program; how a surgical campaign was designed and implemented for rapid impact; the role of national and international collaboration in large-scale health delivery; and the ethical tradeoffs that arise in large-scale public health programs.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Project management, AIDS, policy, supply and demand, partnerships, strategy, innovation

    Redditt V, ole-MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Malaria Control in Zambia. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case reviews the changes in national policy and the subsequent interventions used to reduce the incidence of malaria in Zambia from 2005 to 2010. After providing contextual information on Zambia-including historical, demographic, social, and health information-the case delves into the history of malaria control efforts worldwide and in Zambia. Though Zambia was at the forefront of malaria control-changing policy, adopting new treatment, and aggressively pursuing comprehensive malaria control efforts-in the early 2000s, by 2005 the Zambian government was still falling short of its targets. The National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) resolved to intensify its efforts by developing one national plan to improve coordination, data collection, and partner involvement, and ultimately, to scale up interventions rapidly in order to meet the national malaria targets. The new NMCC director, Dr. Elizabeth Chizema, guided the program toward success through several key interventions described in the case. With basic improvements in monitoring and evaluation, Chizema could demonstrate progress in malaria control. Nonetheless, she worried that partners might lose interest in helping Zambia given the decreasing burden even though the program still had many challenges to overcome.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle
    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle. Source: United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks. Killer Number One: The Fight against Malaria. 2006; 47.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development of a successful malaria control program over time and the components that led to its success, including the value of setting bold national goals, the merits of a health system with centralized governance and decentralized implementation, the importance of multiple coordinated interventions as opposed to a "silver bullet" approach for malaria control, and the use of data as an outcome measure, planning tool, and fundraising tool.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Malaria Control in Zambia (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, malaria eradication and control, leadership

    Redditt V, ole-MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Malaria Control in Zambia (Condensed Version). Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    The case delves into the history of malaria control efforts in Zambia, including control and treatment policy changes in the in the early 2000s that set Zambia apart from other countries. Because by 2005 Zambia was still falling short of its targets, the National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) resolved to intensify its efforts by developing one national plan to improve coordination, data collection, partner involvement, and ultimately, rapidly scale-up interventions to meet the national malaria targets. The new NMCC director, Dr. Elizabeth Chizema, helped the program achieve success through several key interventions described in the case. With improved monitoring and evaluation, Chizema could demonstrate progress in malaria control, but she worried that partners might lose interest in helping Zambia given the low burden, and the program still had many challenges to overcome. This is a condensed version of the case Malaria Control in Zambia

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle
    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle. Source: United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks. Killer Number One: The Fight against Malaria. 2006; 47.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development of a successful malaria control program over time and the components that led to its success including the value of setting bold national goals, the merits of a health system with centralized governance and decentralized implementation, the importance of multiple coordinated interventions as opposed to a "silver bullet" approach for malaria control, and the use of data as an outcome measure, planning tool, and fundraising tool.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Malaria Control in Zambia.

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, malaria eradication and control, leadership

    Cole C, Talbot JR, Rhatigan J, Weintraub R, Porter ME. HIV Prevention in Maharashtra, India. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    The case examines Avahan's delivery model for targeted HIV prevention in India within a value-based framework by describing an implementing nongovernmental organization's district level activities. After providing information about the epidemiological, organizational, and political context, the case shows how the nongovernmental organization, Muslim Samaj Prabodhan Va Shikshan Sanstha (MSPSS), is able to tailor a set of activities to match the needs of its target communities under the guidance of one of Avahan's six "state lead partners," Mukta, which is contracted to recruit and manage grantee NGOs. Through a detailed description of MSPSS' activities, the case examines how high-value, comprehensive HIV preventive services can be delivered to a high-risk population. The case ends with MSPSS's leaders challenged to preserve the value of the program as they prepare to transition the program to government ownership.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    MSPSS Ceremony Honoring Female Police Officer
    MSPSS Ceremony Honoring Female Police Officer. Source: MSPSS. (Exhibit 19 from "HIV Prevention in Maharashtra, India " case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the role of strategy in health care delivery through an examination of how HIV prevention programs generate value for the populations they serve through their selection and configuration of program activities.

    Keywords: Marginalized populations, targeted interventions, strategy, HIV prevention

    Arnquist S, Ellner A, Weintraub R. HIV/AIDS in Brazil: Delivering Prevention in a Decentralized Health System. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case describes the Brazilian National AIDS Program's strategy in the late 2000s to prevent HIV infections. The case is set against the context of a heterogeneous, concentrated epidemic and decentralized public health system that guaranteed access to care and treatment. The case traces the nation's response to HIV from the late 1980s through 2009 via a human rights framework, highlighting the cooperation with civil society. Readers are challenged to understand the relationships between HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, decentralization and sustainability.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Decentralization Policy M&E Indicators
    Decentralization Policy M&E Indicators. Source: National Department of STD, AIDS and Viral Hepatitis. (Exhibit 14 from "HIV/AIDS in Brazil: Delivering Prevention in a Decentralized Health System" case.)

    Learning Objectives: Students should understand the tradeoffs involved in a decentralized governance structure, the levers a central government department can pull to influence local health care delivery in a decentralized health system, and how civil society advocacy contributes to program sustainability.

    Keywords: Human rights, HIV prevention, Sustainability, Role of civil society, Strategy

    Charumilind S, Jain SH, Rhatigan J. The 100% Condom Program: Part B. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This document supplements HIV in Thailand: the 100% Condom Program and recounts the eventual nationwide adoption of that program and its impact on HIV in Thailand.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    HIV and AIDS Projections, 1985-2020
    HIV and AIDS Projections, 1985-2020. Source: Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Health (projections based on data up to 2003). (Exhibit 6 from the "HIV in Thailand: The 100% Condom Program" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To examine the national spread of a regional disease prevention program and evaluate its impact.

    Supporting Content: This document supplements HIV in Thailand: the 100% Condom Program.

    Keywords: HIV prevention, stakeholder alignment, harm reduction

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. HIV/AIDS in Indonesia: Building a Coordinated National Response. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case documents Indonesia’s progress in developing a coordinated national HIV/AIDS response. Within the context of a new democratic government, a weak civil society sector, a newly decentralized and underfunded public health system, and a religiously conservative environment, the case describes how international donors financed and directed HIV/AIDS-related efforts for the first 15 years of the epidemic. In 2006 the National AIDS Commission (NAC) was restructured and awarded funding from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). The case documents how DFID’s flexible financing enabled the NAC to develop a single national strategy, a national monitoring and evaluation framework, and a system of local AIDS commissions. The case ends in 2009 with the NAC preparing to assume a new role as one of three Principal Recipients of the Global Fund to Fight, AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The NAC leadership must contemplate how to sustain and further the progress made in scaling up HIV prevention services while taking on new responsibilities as a Global Fund Principal Recipient.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Map of Indonesia Showing HIV Program Implementers, 2005
    Map of Indonesia Showing HIV Program Implementers, 2005. Source: Indonesia National AIDS Commission. (Exhibit 1 "HIV/AIDS in Indonesia: Building a Coordinated National Response" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the impact of external financing, donor-driven agendas, and a national champion in creating a multisectoral response to HIV in a religiously conservative, lower middle-income country.

    Keywords: National strategy, sustainability, HIV prevention, flexible donor financing

    Cole C, May M, Talbot JR, Weintraub R, Porter ME. The Avahan India AIDS Initiative: Managing Targeted HIV Prevention at Scale. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case is the second in a two-part series describing the Avahan Indian AIDS Initiative (Avahan), a large-scale HIV prevention delivery program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Gates Foundation). The case examines Avahan's choice of intervention strategies in the face of the HIV epidemic of India in 2002. It describes Avahan's structure, operations, and execution style, as well as how Avahan's management system for its seven "state lead partners" and 137 district-level nongovernmental organizations was applied initially to scale and later to sustain the delivery model. The case ends with Avahan's director planning to transfer program ownership to the Government of India.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Examples of Microplanning Tools Developed by Avahan SLPs
    Examples of Microplanning Tools Developed by Avahan SLPs. Source: Created by case writers. (Exhibit 10 "The Avahan India AIDS Initiative: Managing Targeted HIV Prevention at Scale" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the strategies needed to deliver HIV prevention services at scale; how the configuration of management activities can enable rapid scale up of HIV prevention programming; and how these management activities must evolve to sustain delivery at scale.

    Keywords: Management and operations, HIV prevention, transferring large-scale programs to government ownership, scaling up, sustainability, strategy

    Charumilind S, Jain SH, Rhatigan J. HIV in Thailand: The 100% Condom Program. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    Thailand’s 100% Condom Program, which was implemented nationwide in 1991, is widely credited with averting a generalized HIV epidemic in that nation. This case traces the development and implementation of Thailand’s 100% Condom Program including its conception, the development of a pilot program in one province, and the program’s early regional expansion. It frames these events within the country’s general political, economic, and health situation; the epidemiology and public perception of HIV/AIDS; the government’s early HIV policy; and the economics of the commercial sex industry. The case explores how public health interventions are designed, refined, and spread. The case ends in early 1991 with the program’s founder trying to find ways to spread the successful regional program nationwide.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Sex establishments in Patpong Area, including go-go bars and members clubs
    Sex establishments in Patpong Area, including go-go bars and members clubs. Source: "HIV in Thailand: The 100% Condom Program" case.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the principles behind the design of disease prevention programs and to examine how successful programs align incentives among various stakeholders to achieve their objectives.

    Supporting Content: This case has a supplementary summary of history and next steps, titled The 100% Condom Program: Part B.

    Keywords: HIV prevention, stakeholder alignment, harm reduction

     
    ole‐MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W. Building Local Capacity for Health Commodity Manufacturing: A to Z Textile Mills Ltd. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case focuses on the establishment of the Olyset® Consortium—a public-private partnership that was created to facilitate the manufacture of long-lasting insecticidal bed nets to prevent malaria infection in sub-Saharan Africa—and A to Z Textile Mills (“A to Z”), the manufacturer of the nets in Arusha, Tanzania. The case examines how the public-private partnership was developed, its use of an incentive-based supply chain, A to Z’s business model and impact, and the sustainability of the venture. The case reveals that despite significant success in attaining objectives, the misaligned incentives of the many partners presented major obstacles to the overall sustainability of A to Z’s Olyset® production line.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Long Lasting Insecticide Nets and Olyset Production Process
    Long Lasting Insecticide Nets and Olyset Production Process. Source: A to Z Textile Mills Ltd., Arusha, Tanzania (Case Exhibit 9).

    Learning Objectives: To understand the potential for public-private partnerships to leverage innovation and scalability from the private sector and quality and equitable access from the public sector and to examine the costs and benefits of local manufacturing of technologically complex global health commodities in resource-limited settings.

    Keywords: Public-private partnerships, incentive-based supply chain, global health commodity manufacturing, malaria prevention

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