Publications

    Madore A, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. “Sin Taxes” and Health Financing in the Philippines. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the implementation of tobacco tax policy and health system reforms in the Philippines from 2009 to 2015 in the context of the global tobacco control movement, the economic and political influence of the Philippine tobacco industry, and the Philippine health system. After providing background on the prevalence and costs of smoking in the Philippines, the case follows the steps taken by a diverse group of actors to design, promote, and implement higher taxes on tobacco and alcohol products, the primary goals of which were to reduce smoking and raise funds to achieve universal health care. The case highlights the strategies used to counter opposition from the tobacco industry and allied politicians. It focuses on Health Secretary Enrique Ona’s efforts to support sin tax reform and how the country used the resulting revenues to try to improve health care and health insurance coverage. It ends with Ona contemplating the impact of his investments in national health insurance and public health infrastructure as a new health secretary takes his place.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    From left to right: House of Representatives; Woman selling cigarettes
    From left to right: House of Representatives; Woman selling cigarettes. Source: Global Health Delivery Project case writers.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the complexity and trade-offs governments may face in stimulating their economy, regulating industry, and improving public health; the importance of data in driving and sustaining policy reform; the role of financing policies and funding as tools for health system strengthening and value creation when leveraged strategically; and the potential for health to unify different actors and sectors to generate new policy and restructure fiscal and financial systems.

    Keywords: Health insurance, health care financing, tobacco control, smoking, universal health care implementation, policy, cross sector collaboration, health system reform, political leadership, management

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. HIV/AIDS in Indonesia: Building a Coordinated National Response. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case documents Indonesia’s progress in developing a coordinated national HIV/AIDS response. Within the context of a new democratic government, a weak civil society sector, a newly decentralized and underfunded public health system, and a religiously conservative environment, the case describes how international donors financed and directed HIV/AIDS-related efforts for the first 15 years of the epidemic. In 2006 the National AIDS Commission (NAC) was restructured and awarded funding from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). The case documents how DFID’s flexible financing enabled the NAC to develop a single national strategy, a national monitoring and evaluation framework, and a system of local AIDS commissions. The case ends in 2009 with the NAC preparing to assume a new role as one of three Principal Recipients of the Global Fund to Fight, AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The NAC leadership must contemplate how to sustain and further the progress made in scaling up HIV prevention services while taking on new responsibilities as a Global Fund Principal Recipient.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Map of Indonesia Showing HIV Program Implementers, 2005
    Map of Indonesia Showing HIV Program Implementers, 2005. Source: Indonesia National AIDS Commission. (Exhibit 1 "HIV/AIDS in Indonesia: Building a Coordinated National Response" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the impact of external financing, donor-driven agendas, and a national champion in creating a multisectoral response to HIV in a religiously conservative, lower middle-income country.

    Keywords: National strategy, sustainability, HIV prevention, flexible donor financing

    ole‐MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W. Building Local Capacity for Health Commodity Manufacturing: A to Z Textile Mills Ltd. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case focuses on the establishment of the Olyset® Consortium—a public-private partnership that was created to facilitate the manufacture of long-lasting insecticidal bed nets to prevent malaria infection in sub-Saharan Africa—and A to Z Textile Mills (“A to Z”), the manufacturer of the nets in Arusha, Tanzania. The case examines how the public-private partnership was developed, its use of an incentive-based supply chain, A to Z’s business model and impact, and the sustainability of the venture. The case reveals that despite significant success in attaining objectives, the misaligned incentives of the many partners presented major obstacles to the overall sustainability of A to Z’s Olyset® production line.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Long Lasting Insecticide Nets and Olyset Production Process
    Long Lasting Insecticide Nets and Olyset Production Process. Source: A to Z Textile Mills Ltd., Arusha, Tanzania (Case Exhibit 9).

    Learning Objectives: To understand the potential for public-private partnerships to leverage innovation and scalability from the private sector and quality and equitable access from the public sector and to examine the costs and benefits of local manufacturing of technologically complex global health commodities in resource-limited settings.

    Keywords: Public-private partnerships, incentive-based supply chain, global health commodity manufacturing, malaria prevention