Publications

    Cuneo CN, Rosenberg J, Madore A, Weintraub R. Improving Mental Health Services for Survivors of Sexual Violence in the DRC. Harvard Business Publishing. 2017.Abstract

    This case explores the implementation and evaluation of mental health treatment for victims of conflict-related gender-based violence (GBV) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by the International Rescue Committee (IRC), a humanitarian organization based in New York City. Following the contextual background, the case traces the IRC’s work developing a psychosocial support program for GBV survivors starting in 2002. When the Applied Mental Health Research Group (AMHR) at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health evaluates the program in 2008, the IRC begins to consider the potential for its work to inform similar interventions. In 2011, the IRC team collaborated with AMHR to implement two concurrent randomized control trials (RCTs): one on the mental health effects of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and the other on the mental health and financial impact of a social and economic empowerment intervention called the Village Savings and Loans Association (VSLA). While the time and resources that went into completing the trials expanded the monitoring and evaluation capacity within the IRC and added important evidence to the lean body of global mental health literature, conducting the studies stretched the IRC’s local staff thin and required clarification of priorities and purpose. Had the RCTs had been worth it, and for whom? How could the study findings contribute to improving services for vulnerable populations in the region and beyond? 

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Theory of Change
    Source: Study of Effectiveness of a Social-Economic Intervention for Sexual Violence Survivors in Eastern DRC, November 2014.

    Theory of Change 2
    Source: Group Cognitive Processing Therapy: A Specialized Mental Health Intervention that Supports Improvements in Well-being for Sexual Violence Survivors. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, International Rescue Committee.

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenge of meeting human resource needs to provide mental health care, the complexity of implementation and empirical study of mental health services, and the ethics and challenges of conducting randomized controlled trials in conflict settings.

    Keywords: public health, human resources, health care delivery, information management, mental health, scale-up, resource-limited settings, health care policy, data collection, public administration

    Madore A, Yousif H, Rosenberg J, Desmond C, Weintraub R. Political Leadership in South Africa: HIV. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case describes the rapid scale-up of South Africa’s national HIV/AIDS response from 2009 until 2015. After providing background on apartheid, the impact of HIV/AIDS denialism, and an overview of the health system in South Africa, the case follows Minster of Health Aaron Motsoaledi’s leadership of the national department of health’s HIV/AIDS program. The response included four key components: a countrywide counseling and testing campaign, capacity building to increase access to treatment, an overhaul of the ARV bidding and procurement processes, and promotion of voluntary male medical circumcision. The case highlights how Motsoaledi and his team leveraged expertise and resources from domestic and international organizations to support ambitious testing and treatment goals. It focuses on Motsoaledi’s communication strategies and the factors that influenced his planning and implementation decisions. The case ends with Motsoaledi considering how to advance the national HIV/AIDS program amid larger health system issues, including overcrowding and limited monitoring capacity.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Promotion of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV
    Promotion of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (source: Global Health Delivery Project case writers)

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate how politics can shape the trajectory of an epidemic; the importance of leveraging existing resources to scale services in a public health system; the challenges of transitioning from an emergency response to a sustainable public program; and the competing interests of a vertical intervention program and the complex health system within which it operates.

    Keywords: Political leadership, data and health policy, counseling and testing, adherence, advocacy, HIV treatment, health care delivery, cross-sector collaboration, vertical programs, value creation, drug procurement, civil society, strategy

     

    Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Postoperative recovery area
    Postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring at AIC Kijabe Hospital Surgical Facilities. Source: Case Writers.

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

    Wachter K, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Partners In Health in Neno District, Malawi. Harvard Business Publishing. 2013.Abstract

    Set in Neno District, Malawi from 2007–2012, the case focuses on the economic impact of investing in health care infrastructure. It examines management decisions that leaders of Abwenzi Pa Za Umoyo (APZU) and its founding organization—Partners In Health (PIH)—made as they supported the Government of Malawi in building a hospital and scaling up the delivery of APZU clinical and social programs across Neno district. The case highlights how a non-governmental organization can navigate the politics and local culture to improve Malawi’s health care system in close partnership with a strong, protocol-driven government. The case begins with Ophelia Dahl, co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health, reflecting on her December 2011 trip to Neno, nearly four years after her first visit. She observed signs of progress unrelated to health—bank branches had opened in town, a new road had been built, and the market had expanded dramatically. Ultimately, the case explores what this demonstrates about the value of her organization’s investments in health.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Neno rural hospital
    In the foreground: One-story original structures of Neno Rural Hospital used for outpatient and maternity services. In back: Two-story building constructed by APZU and partners used for inpatient wards, meetings, computer use, laboratory work, and government offices. Source: Keri Wachter, 2012.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the challenges of hiring and retaining local and expat staff, the complexity of an international NGO partnering with the government to improve health care, how leadership acumen and approaches impact scaling up and sustaining health care delivery, the relationship between the district hospital and the local economy, and how to assess impact beyond health measures.

    Keywords: Global health, social equality, project management, business and government relations, partnerships, strategy, economic development, health care policy, health care delivery, public health, human resource management, developing countries, innovation

    Madore A, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Electronic Medical Records at ISS Clinic Mbarara, Uganda. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case traces the evolution of the medical records system at the Immune Suppression Syndrome (ISS) Clinic in Mbarara, Uganda. After providing some background on Uganda, its HIV epidemic, and the general rise of electronic medical records and software, it explains the history of the ISS Clinic and its service delivery model. ISS Clinic had used paper records to manage care, treatment, and reporting needs until it partnered with the University of California, San Francisco on research initiatives. In 2004 ISS Clinic became a global health initiative beneficiary and the outpatient antiretroviral therapy center of Mbarara Regional Hospital. Offering free treatment, patient enrollment jumped dramatically. The clinic's electronic Access database was unable to keep up. The clinic secured a grant to implement a new medical record system, and leaders struggled to convince the physicians and other stakeholders of its value. The most clinically-relevant pieces were slow to be put in place, and new Ministry of Health regulations posed minor setbacks. At the end of 2010, the clinic had seen nearly 21,000 patients. Clinic research had contributed to more than 20 peer-reviewed articles, but the long-term prospects for the database were unknown.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Screenshot of an Electronic Form in OpenMRS, ISS Clinic
    Screenshot of an Electronic Form in OpenMRS, ISS Clinic. Source: ISS Clinic. (Exhibit 12 from "Electronic Medical Records at ISS Clinic Mbarara, Uganda" case.)

    Learning Objectives: This case documents the evolution of medical records at an HIV/AIDS clinic in a resource-limited setting. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate what it takes to collect and systemize accurate health data for patient care and research, what it takes to implement an electronic medical system in a resource-limited setting, and the relationship between a health record system, clinical care, and public health.

    Keywords: Management and operations, HIV treatment, health research, health information systems

     

    Talbot JR, Cole C, May M, Weintraub R. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) campaign in Nyanza Province, Kenya as it transformed from the subject of a randomized clinical trial into national policy. After providing some background on the cultural, political, and scientific context surrounding male circumcision, the case traces the PEPFAR-funded implementers' advances in delivering male circumcision in Nyanza. It examines the various delivery models used in Nyanza and the evolution of the relationship between implementers as well as on the development of the national strategic plan for VMMC released in 2009. The case ends with the implementers having come together successfully for two rapid, aggressive, 30-day implementation campaigns and the head of Kenya's National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Programme wrestling with how to make such campaigns sustainable and what lessons from the campaign to pass on to the national program.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Mobile Service Delivery Model
    (A) Group counseling on male circumcision; (B) mobile circumcision counseling site; and (C) circumcision being conducted in tented delivery site. Source: Nyanza Reproductive Health Society.

    Learning Objectives: To understand how a randomized controlled trial may be translated into a large-scale public health program; how a surgical campaign was designed and implemented for rapid impact; the role of national and international collaboration in large-scale health delivery; and the ethical tradeoffs that arise in large-scale public health programs.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Project management, AIDS, policy, supply and demand, partnerships, strategy, innovation

    Redditt V, ole-MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Malaria Control in Zambia. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case reviews the changes in national policy and the subsequent interventions used to reduce the incidence of malaria in Zambia from 2005 to 2010. After providing contextual information on Zambia-including historical, demographic, social, and health information-the case delves into the history of malaria control efforts worldwide and in Zambia. Though Zambia was at the forefront of malaria control-changing policy, adopting new treatment, and aggressively pursuing comprehensive malaria control efforts-in the early 2000s, by 2005 the Zambian government was still falling short of its targets. The National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) resolved to intensify its efforts by developing one national plan to improve coordination, data collection, and partner involvement, and ultimately, to scale up interventions rapidly in order to meet the national malaria targets. The new NMCC director, Dr. Elizabeth Chizema, guided the program toward success through several key interventions described in the case. With basic improvements in monitoring and evaluation, Chizema could demonstrate progress in malaria control. Nonetheless, she worried that partners might lose interest in helping Zambia given the decreasing burden even though the program still had many challenges to overcome.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle
    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle. Source: United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks. Killer Number One: The Fight against Malaria. 2006; 47.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development of a successful malaria control program over time and the components that led to its success, including the value of setting bold national goals, the merits of a health system with centralized governance and decentralized implementation, the importance of multiple coordinated interventions as opposed to a "silver bullet" approach for malaria control, and the use of data as an outcome measure, planning tool, and fundraising tool.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Malaria Control in Zambia (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, malaria eradication and control, leadership

    Bitton A, Talbot JR, Clarke L. Tobacco Control in South Africa. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case reviews the policy changes in tobacco control in post-apartheid South Africa from 1994 to 1996 under the leadership of Minister of Health Dr. Nkosazana Zuma. After providing contextual information on South Africa, including historical, demographic, social, and health information, the case delves into the history of tobacco and of global tobacco control efforts. The case then details the history of tobacco in South Africa, including data collection, epidemiology, early control efforts, and the policy efforts of the mid-1990s. The case describes the African National Congress (ANC)’s policy victories under Zuma’s leadership. Knowing that tobacco disproportionately affected certain racial and minority groups, Zuma made tobacco control a top priority. With the support of the President, local tobacco experts, and anti-tobacco advocates, Zuma worked hard to break previous connections between the government and the tobacco industry and to reduce smoking. The case ends in 1996 when smoking prevalence had declined to 32% from 34% in 1995, but South Africa still had one of the highest levels in the developing world. As the ANC was preparing to enact the new Constitution that reinforced health promotion, Zuma had to determine what her next move would be for tobacco control and how she would prioritize it with the other health needs of the country.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Tobacco Control as Health Promotion
    Tobacco Control as Health Promotion. Source: Reddy, SP and Swart D. Unraveling Health Promotion: A Framework for Action: Tobacco Control. MRC: 1998. (Exhibit 8 in "Tobacco Control in South Africa" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the political and economic forces that impact tobacco control legislation in a country undergoing an epidemiological shift, the role of research and data, and the value of health communication, chronic disease prevention, and advocacy in health care delivery.

    Supporting Content: This case has a supplementary summary of history and next steps, titled Tobacco Control in South Africa: Next Steps.

    Keywords: Chronic disease prevention, advocacy, health policy, tobacco control

     

    Park P, Bhatt A, Rhatigan J. The Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS (AMPATH), and its founding organization, the Indiana University – Moi University (IU-MU) Partnership in Eldoret, Kenya. The case opens with a discussion of AMPATH’s new Home-Based Counseling and Testing Program (HCT) and its prospects for improving HIV care in Western Kenya. After providing some background on the general political, economic, and health situation in Kenya, it follows the development of the IU-MU Partnership from 1990 to 2000, its subsequent entry into HIV care services through AMPATH in 2001, and AMPATH’s rapid growth to become the largest provider of HIV services in Kenya. It then describes the organizational and operational characteristics of AMPATH and concludes with the organization wrestling with the opportunities and operational challenges that HCT presents.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    AMPATH Center in Eldoret, Kenya
    AMPATH Center in Eldoret, Kenya. Source: Case writer. (Exhibit 12 in "The Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS " case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development and design of a large scale HIV care program in a resource-limited setting and to examine how HIV treatment programs can effectively configure their services to provide maximum value to the populations they serve.

    Keywords: Service expansion, the role of academic medical centers, HIV treatment and prevention, home-based counseling and treatment

    Sullivan E, Drobac P, Thompson K, Rodriguez W. Botswana’s Program in Preventing Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of Botswana’s prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) program, from its inception as a pilot program in 1999 through its national expansion in 2002 and its struggle to improve outcomes and integrate with broader maternal and child care services through 2008. After providing some background on Botswana, its demographics and health situation, including HIV/AIDS and that national response, the case provides an overview of PMTCT—a critical challenge in global health—and describes the inception of the PMTCT program in Botswana. Readers see the challenges the program faced upon the initial scale-up and explore the key efforts and advances in process and policy that help the country overcome them and become a well known PMTCT success story. The case ends with the program wrestling with a relatively small group of women and their infants who fell through the cracks in the program and several holes in the health system that are preventing the program from eradicating infant HIV completely and tracking its progress.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

     

    PMTCT Programme vehicle. Credit: Erin Sullivan
    PMTCT Programme vehicle. Credit: Erin Sullivan.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the role of a robust strategy, including experimentation, adoption, process improvement, and policy in global health implementation and national scale-up strategies.

    Keywords: Health care policy, Horizontal programming, HIV prevention, Translation of research into practice

    Kleinman S, Talbot JR, Harris J, Ellner A. The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) of Uganda. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of The AIDS Support Organization (TASO), a Ugandan non-governmental organization, from 2001 to 2006. One of the first organizations to become involved in HIV/AIDS in the late 1980s, TASO began as a meeting place for people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, helping people to live positively. The organization provided free counselling, social support, limited medical care, community mobilizing, advocacy and networking. TASO worked alongside government facilities and trained government medical personnel in HIV counselling. After many years, TASO got a new director who brought management skills, a commitment to professionalizing the organization, and a drive to expand services. TASO began incorporating antiretroviral therapy (ART) into its offerings. The ART delivery model combined home and clinic-based care in order to maximize patient adherence. The case follows the development of the organization and scale up of services and raises the question of how to deliver care most cost effectively while maintaining its values and meeting the changing needs of the population and clients.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO
    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO

    Learning Objectives: Students should learn how a healthcare delivery organization can expand and evolve over time in response to changes in external context and the needs of its clients; how public and private organizations can coordinate to meet the varied needs of a population; and the importance of leadership, management, and strategic vision in creating successful global health programs.

    Keywords: Service expansion, Home- and clinic-based care, HIV prevention and treatment.