Publications

    Wachter K, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Partners In Health in Neno District, Malawi. Harvard Business Publishing. 2013.Abstract

    Set in Neno District, Malawi from 2007–2012, the case focuses on the economic impact of investing in health care infrastructure. It examines management decisions that leaders of Abwenzi Pa Za Umoyo (APZU) and its founding organization—Partners In Health (PIH)—made as they supported the Government of Malawi in building a hospital and scaling up the delivery of APZU clinical and social programs across Neno district. The case highlights how a non-governmental organization can navigate the politics and local culture to improve Malawi’s health care system in close partnership with a strong, protocol-driven government. The case begins with Ophelia Dahl, co-founder and executive director of Partners In Health, reflecting on her December 2011 trip to Neno, nearly four years after her first visit. She observed signs of progress unrelated to health—bank branches had opened in town, a new road had been built, and the market had expanded dramatically. Ultimately, the case explores what this demonstrates about the value of her organization’s investments in health.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Neno rural hospital
    In the foreground: One-story original structures of Neno Rural Hospital used for outpatient and maternity services. In back: Two-story building constructed by APZU and partners used for inpatient wards, meetings, computer use, laboratory work, and government offices. Source: Keri Wachter, 2012.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the challenges of hiring and retaining local and expat staff, the complexity of an international NGO partnering with the government to improve health care, how leadership acumen and approaches impact scaling up and sustaining health care delivery, the relationship between the district hospital and the local economy, and how to assess impact beyond health measures.

    Keywords: Global health, social equality, project management, business and government relations, partnerships, strategy, economic development, health care policy, health care delivery, public health, human resource management, developing countries, innovation

    Cole C, Talbot JR, Rhatigan J, Weintraub R, Porter ME. HIV Prevention in Maharashtra, India. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    The case examines Avahan's delivery model for targeted HIV prevention in India within a value-based framework by describing an implementing nongovernmental organization's district level activities. After providing information about the epidemiological, organizational, and political context, the case shows how the nongovernmental organization, Muslim Samaj Prabodhan Va Shikshan Sanstha (MSPSS), is able to tailor a set of activities to match the needs of its target communities under the guidance of one of Avahan's six "state lead partners," Mukta, which is contracted to recruit and manage grantee NGOs. Through a detailed description of MSPSS' activities, the case examines how high-value, comprehensive HIV preventive services can be delivered to a high-risk population. The case ends with MSPSS's leaders challenged to preserve the value of the program as they prepare to transition the program to government ownership.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    MSPSS Ceremony Honoring Female Police Officer
    MSPSS Ceremony Honoring Female Police Officer. Source: MSPSS. (Exhibit 19 from "HIV Prevention in Maharashtra, India " case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the role of strategy in health care delivery through an examination of how HIV prevention programs generate value for the populations they serve through their selection and configuration of program activities.

    Keywords: Marginalized populations, targeted interventions, strategy, HIV prevention

    Park P, Bhatt A, Rhatigan J. The Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of the Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS (AMPATH), and its founding organization, the Indiana University – Moi University (IU-MU) Partnership in Eldoret, Kenya. The case opens with a discussion of AMPATH’s new Home-Based Counseling and Testing Program (HCT) and its prospects for improving HIV care in Western Kenya. After providing some background on the general political, economic, and health situation in Kenya, it follows the development of the IU-MU Partnership from 1990 to 2000, its subsequent entry into HIV care services through AMPATH in 2001, and AMPATH’s rapid growth to become the largest provider of HIV services in Kenya. It then describes the organizational and operational characteristics of AMPATH and concludes with the organization wrestling with the opportunities and operational challenges that HCT presents.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    AMPATH Center in Eldoret, Kenya
    AMPATH Center in Eldoret, Kenya. Source: Case writer. (Exhibit 12 in "The Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS " case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development and design of a large scale HIV care program in a resource-limited setting and to examine how HIV treatment programs can effectively configure their services to provide maximum value to the populations they serve.

    Keywords: Service expansion, the role of academic medical centers, HIV treatment and prevention, home-based counseling and treatment

    Pabo E, Rhatigan J, Ellner A, Lyon E. HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Hinche, Haiti. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case examines the potential for a non-governmental organization, Zanmi Lasante/Partners in Health (ZL/PIH), to aid in improving voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) services for HIV at a government hospital in Hinche, Haiti. The events of the case begin when the local government official who oversees the hospital invites ZL/PIH to work with the government to improve the hospital’s VCT services. After providing background information on the history of Haiti, on Hinche, and on the state of the current VCT program, the case describes ZL/PIH’s health care delivery model including its management systems, its use of community health workers, and its social programs. It explains how ZL/PIH adapted its mod

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Rainy season on the roads, Central Plateau, Haiti
    Rainy season on the roads, Central Plateau, Haiti; Credit: Evan Lyon

    Learning Objectives: To understand how social, economic and political factors influence health care delivery and to examine effective strategies to address these factors in the design of health care programs.

    Supporting Content: This case has a supplementary summary of history and next steps, titled Two Years in Hinche.

    Keywords: Community-based organizations, HIV prevention, government-NGO partnerships

    Pabo E, Ellner A, Rhatigan J, Lyon E. Two Years in Hinche. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    Two Years in Hinche is a brief supplement to HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Hinche, Haiti. The first case describes an underperforming HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing Program in government run hospital in Hinche, Haiti, and the decision by a government official to invite, Zanmi Lasante/Partners in Health (ZL/PIH), a non governmental organization, to help revamp the program. After a detailed examination of the program and of the ZL/PIH health care delivery model, the case ends with ZL/PIH agreeing to collaborate with the government to revamp the program. This case describes the subsequent steps ZL/PIH took to increase the amount of patients that received HIV counseling and testing by ten-fold, and to begin an HIV treatment program. It details how they were able to adapt their model for the public sector, improve supply chains, integrate staffs, and build community trust.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    VCT Room at Sainte Thérèse Hospital

    Learning Objectives: To examine effective strategies for improving uptake of preventive health services in low-resource settings.

    Supporting Content: This case is the supplement to HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Hinche, Haiti.

    Keywords: Community-based organizations, HIV prevention, government-NGO partnerships

    Kleinman S, Talbot JR, Harris J, Ellner A. The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) of Uganda. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case traces the development of The AIDS Support Organization (TASO), a Ugandan non-governmental organization, from 2001 to 2006. One of the first organizations to become involved in HIV/AIDS in the late 1980s, TASO began as a meeting place for people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, helping people to live positively. The organization provided free counselling, social support, limited medical care, community mobilizing, advocacy and networking. TASO worked alongside government facilities and trained government medical personnel in HIV counselling. After many years, TASO got a new director who brought management skills, a commitment to professionalizing the organization, and a drive to expand services. TASO began incorporating antiretroviral therapy (ART) into its offerings. The ART delivery model combined home and clinic-based care in order to maximize patient adherence. The case follows the development of the organization and scale up of services and raises the question of how to deliver care most cost effectively while maintaining its values and meeting the changing needs of the population and clients.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO
    Training health workers to care for HIV/AIDS patients in Uganda. Credit: Sarah Kleinman; TASO

    Learning Objectives: Students should learn how a healthcare delivery organization can expand and evolve over time in response to changes in external context and the needs of its clients; how public and private organizations can coordinate to meet the varied needs of a population; and the importance of leadership, management, and strategic vision in creating successful global health programs.

    Keywords: Service expansion, Home- and clinic-based care, HIV prevention and treatment.