Publications

    Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Chasing Polio Eradication: Vaccine Development. Harvard Business Publishing. 2019.Abstract

     

    This case describes the development and rollout of bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV), starting in 2007, to support the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in eliminating poliovirus. After providing background on the global polio eradication program, the case explores the policy decisions behind the development of bOPV, progression through clinical trials, licensure, and distribution of the vaccine. In particular, the case examines the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in accelerating the progression through these stages. The case study ends with Steve Cochi and Roland Sutter of WHO reflecting on the successes of bOPV and its impact on the eradication program at a global level.


    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Learning objectives: A productive class discussion will allow readers to understand the importance of product development to respond rapidly to the needs of a global health initiative as well as the complexities of ensuring the engagement of stakeholders involved in vaccine development, and the potential role of the public sector in facilitating product development.

    Supporting content: The case entitled Polio Elimination in Uttar Pradesh, India may provide helpful background information.

    Keywords: randomized controlled trial, global health, public health, vaccine development, supply chain management, disease eradication, public-private partnership, collaboration, product development

     

    Madore A, Rosenberg J, Dreisbach T, Weintraub R. Positive Outlier: Health Outcomes in Kerala, India over Time. Harvard Business Publishing. 2018.Abstract

    This case explores how Kerala, India developed a reputation for exemplary health outcomes despite low per capita income. After providing historical background, including the social, political, and health system factors that contributed to a culture of seeking health care, the case describes Kerala’s health system and outcomes. The case describes how the fiscal decline in the latter half of the 20th century led to decreased spending on public services, including health, creating an opening for private-sector providers to meet a growing share of the demand for health services and the impact on out-of-pocket health spending. Readers must think about how emerging health threats such as noncommunicable diseases should be addressed in the 21st century, including the health department’s response and a new initiative to increase capacity in the public health sector, including efforts to improve the quality and reliability of health data through an electronic medical record system. The case concludes with Additional Chief Secretary for Health and Family Welfare Rajeev Sadanandan wondering if the new strategy will succeed and if Kerala can maintain its status as a positive outlier in health for the decades to come.

    Teaching Note available for registered faculty through Harvard Business Publishing and the Case Centre.

    Learning Objectives: to appreciate the relationships between education, literacy, and health; what the components of a health system are; the limitations of health indicators as measures of a national health system’s effectiveness; and, the challenges of sustaining demand and maintaining the supply and quality of public health services over time.

    Key words: health care policy, universal health care, demand generation, health care delivery, health system, health outcomes, social determinants of health

    Rosenberg J, Dreisbach T, Donovan C, Weintraub R. Positive Outlier: Sri Lanka’s Health Outcomes over Time. Harvard Business Publishing. 2018.Abstract

    This case describes the development and structure of Sri Lanka’s health system, which has yielded health outcomes far superior to any of its South Asian neighbors. The case highlights factors supporting the health outcomes, including the availability of free health services to all citizens, government investment in the health workforce, and the care-seeking behavior of Sri Lankan citizens. After providing an overview of Sri Lanka’s history, geography, demographics, and economy, the case traces the evolution of the public sector health system from the precolonial era through the period of heavy investment in health from the 1930s through 1950s and on into the 21st century. The case describes the management of the system and the relationship between the national health ministry and provincial and local governments. It examines how health professionals are trained and deployed throughout the system, the supply chain, and financing. The case then examines the growing private health sector, its relationship with the public sector, and the role of innovation. After a summary of the country’s health outcomes, readers are pushed to think about what it will take to address the changing epidemiological burden to continue to boast exemplary health outcomes and provide quality health care to those who need it.

    ​​​​​​Teaching Note available to registered faculty through Harvard Business Publishing or the Case Centre.

    A productive class discussion will allow readers to appreciate the capabilities of a public payer system to improve the health of the population; the influence of the private sector in a “single payer system” and the downstream effects on demand and supply of services; the return on investment for a country offering free public medical and nursing education; and the relationship between literacy, demand generation, and health outcomes.

    Keywords: Universal health care, health care delivery, health system, health outcomes, social determinants of health.

    Sue K, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. Addressing Tanzania’s Health Workforce Crisis Through a Public-Private Partnership: The Case of TTCIH. Harvard Business Publishing. 2016.Abstract

    Set in rural Tanzania, this case traces the founding and development of the Tanzanian Training Centre for International Health (TTCIH) from the early 2000s through 2015. It begins with an overview of the political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context of Tanzania, followed by a detailed description of the human resource for health crisis in Tanzania and the landscape of available health care training programs. The case then explores the origins and evolution of TTCIH, launched through a unique collaboration between private industry, a public health institute, local stakeholders and educators, and the Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare. It describes the evolution of TTCIH as leaders strive to make it self-sustaining and responsive to Tanzania’s health workforce crisis. The case highlights the challenges of successfully integrating corporate management practices and values into a global health program and the role of strategic leadership to sustain TTCIH.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013
    TTCIH Income and Number of Students, 2005–2013

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the challenges of designing sustainable, high-quality health training institutions in low-resource settings; the training and resources needed to support task shifting and to address health workforce shortages in health care delivery; and, the importance of maintaining a sound strategy for medical education programs in the midst of changing national health needs and the evolving medical education landscape.

    Keywords: Global health, public health, health care delivery, education, government, value creation, Human Resources for Health, health care, nongovernmental organizations, Public-Private partnerships, learning, revenue growth, organizational effectiveness

     

    Arnquist S, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. The Indus Hospital: Building Surgical Capacity in Pakistan (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

    Set in Karachi, Pakistan, this case examines a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting. Within Pakistan's health care system and its political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context, the case focuses on the Indus Hospital, a charity hospital started in 2007. The case explores the effect of financing, leadership, and a mission-driven culture on health care delivery and the hospital's efforts to provide high-quality care for free to poor patients. It concludes with Indus' leaders planning how to expand their service delivery to include primary and preventative care. This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic
    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic. Pakistani architect Tariq Quaiser designed the Indus Hospital’s open-air TB clinic with a specialized design that optimized natural ventilation for increased airflow that effectively minimized the spread of disease. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting, how private financing impacts health care delivery, and the impact of leadership on health care delivery.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan.

    Keywords: Human rights, workforce management, sustainability, role of civil society, information systems, organizational culture

    Madore A, Yousif H, Rosenberg J, Desmond C, Weintraub R. Political Leadership in South Africa: National Health Insurance. Harvard Business Publishing. 2015.Abstract

    This case traces the development of national health insurance (NHI) in South Africa under Minister of Health Aaron Motsoaledi. After providing background on health financing and health insurance policy in South Africa, the case explores Motsoaledi’s approach to realizing universal health coverage by establishing a government-administered NHI system and overhauling primary health care in the public sector. The case highlights the importance of strategic communication and stakeholder engagement in the highly political process of health system reform. It focuses on the complexity of the NHI policy process and the steps Motsoaledi and his team took to increase standards and accountability for public primary health care facilities. It concludes with the national health department rolling out new tools for monitoring facility progress and Motsoaledi awaiting approval of his team’s 19th draft plan for NHI, wondering what to do in the meantime to improve health care.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    National Department of Health, South Africa
    National Department of Health, South Africa (Source: Global Health Delivery case writers)

    Learning Objectives: A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the relationship between policy development, financing, and implementation of public health care delivery; the complexity of implementing standards and accountability for primary care infrastructure; and the work and negotiation needed to build consensus among private and public payers and providers with competing financial interests to generate greater value in health care delivery.

    Keywords: Political leadership, health system strengthening, stakeholder engagement, primary health care reform, policy development, politics and health care, health care financing, health insurance, strategy

     

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    Set in Karachi, Pakistan, this case examines a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting. Within Pakistan's health care system and its political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context, the case focuses on the Indus Hospital, a charity hospital started in 2007. The case explores the effect of financing, leadership, and a mission-driven culture on health care delivery and the hospital's efforts to provide high-quality care for free to poor patients. It concludes with Indus' leaders planning how to expand their service delivery to include primary and preventative care.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic
    Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic. Pakistani architect Tariq Quaiser designed the Indus Hospital’s open-air TB clinic with a specialized design that optimized natural ventilation for increased airflow that effectively minimized the spread of disease. Source: Case writers.

    Learning Objectives: To understand a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting, how private financing impacts health care delivery, and the impact of leadership on health care delivery.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled The Indus Hospital: Building Surgical Capacity in Pakistan (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: Human rights, workforce management, sustainability, role of civil society, information systems, organizational culture

    ole-MoiYoi K, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Roll-Out of Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Malaria in Swaziland. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    After outlining the history of malaria in Swaziland, this focused case study examines the implementation of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria in Swaziland to improve case management and to strengthen the national malaria surveillance system as the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) aims to implement a national elimination strategy. In addition to information on RDT selection, the case details Swaziland's quality assurance program-the first of its kind in the region, the public health benefits of the immediate disease notification system for active case detection, and Simon Kunene's leadership qualities as the manager of the NMCP for 24 years. The case addresses the necessary increases in financing and human resources to support the strategy and evaluates the impact of RDTs on the strategy. Challenges the NMCP faces in achieving malaria elimination include sustaining political will, interest, and financial commitments from donors and strengthening health workforce training and RDT procurement and distribution.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Milestones toward Malaria Elimination
    Milestones toward Malaria Elimination. Source: The Global Malaria Action Plan: For a malaria-free world. Roll Back Malaria Partnership, 2008. (Exhibit 4 from "Roll-Out of Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Malaria in Swaziland" case.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the role of diagnostics in a malaria elimination strategy, what it takes to effectively integrate a new diagnostic into care delivery, how leaders generate social and political capital over time, and the intricacies of managing a national disease program.

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, diagnostic testing strategies, malaria eradication and control

    Arnquist S, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. loveLife: Transitions After 2005. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case focuses on how loveLife, South Africa's largest youth-focused nongovernmental organization, recovered from losing one-third of its operating revenues in 2006 when the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria chose not to renew funding to South Africa. The case describes managers' decisions to downsize and secure additional government funding to save the organization and the ways in which the original strategy guided these changes. The case ends in 2009 with loveLife's new chief executive officer contemplating how to secure the organization's future amid national political changes and funding challenges.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    loveLife Program Coverage, 2007. Source: loveLife
    loveLife Program Coverage, 2007. Source: loveLife. (Exhibit 6 from "loveLife: Transitions After 2005" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To appreciate how crises can impact program management and activities, the role of leadership in responding to crises, the benefits of second generation leadership for an organization, and the implications of transitioning from international funding sources to domestic government funding sources.

    Supporting Content: This case is a sequel to loveLife: Preventing HIV Among South African Youth.

    Keywords: National strategy, impact of financing, HIV prevention, leadership, sustainability

    Redditt V, ole-MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Malaria Control in Zambia. Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    This case reviews the changes in national policy and the subsequent interventions used to reduce the incidence of malaria in Zambia from 2005 to 2010. After providing contextual information on Zambia-including historical, demographic, social, and health information-the case delves into the history of malaria control efforts worldwide and in Zambia. Though Zambia was at the forefront of malaria control-changing policy, adopting new treatment, and aggressively pursuing comprehensive malaria control efforts-in the early 2000s, by 2005 the Zambian government was still falling short of its targets. The National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) resolved to intensify its efforts by developing one national plan to improve coordination, data collection, and partner involvement, and ultimately, to scale up interventions rapidly in order to meet the national malaria targets. The new NMCC director, Dr. Elizabeth Chizema, guided the program toward success through several key interventions described in the case. With basic improvements in monitoring and evaluation, Chizema could demonstrate progress in malaria control. Nonetheless, she worried that partners might lose interest in helping Zambia given the decreasing burden even though the program still had many challenges to overcome.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle
    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle. Source: United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks. Killer Number One: The Fight against Malaria. 2006; 47.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development of a successful malaria control program over time and the components that led to its success, including the value of setting bold national goals, the merits of a health system with centralized governance and decentralized implementation, the importance of multiple coordinated interventions as opposed to a "silver bullet" approach for malaria control, and the use of data as an outcome measure, planning tool, and fundraising tool.

    Supporting Content: There is a shorter version of this case titled Malaria Control in Zambia (Condensed Version).

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, malaria eradication and control, leadership

    Redditt V, ole-MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Malaria Control in Zambia (Condensed Version). Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

    The case delves into the history of malaria control efforts in Zambia, including control and treatment policy changes in the in the early 2000s that set Zambia apart from other countries. Because by 2005 Zambia was still falling short of its targets, the National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) resolved to intensify its efforts by developing one national plan to improve coordination, data collection, partner involvement, and ultimately, rapidly scale-up interventions to meet the national malaria targets. The new NMCC director, Dr. Elizabeth Chizema, helped the program achieve success through several key interventions described in the case. With improved monitoring and evaluation, Chizema could demonstrate progress in malaria control, but she worried that partners might lose interest in helping Zambia given the low burden, and the program still had many challenges to overcome. This is a condensed version of the case Malaria Control in Zambia

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle
    Plasmodium Falciparum life cycle. Source: United Nations Integrated Regional Information Networks. Killer Number One: The Fight against Malaria. 2006; 47.

    Learning Objectives: To understand the development of a successful malaria control program over time and the components that led to its success including the value of setting bold national goals, the merits of a health system with centralized governance and decentralized implementation, the importance of multiple coordinated interventions as opposed to a "silver bullet" approach for malaria control, and the use of data as an outcome measure, planning tool, and fundraising tool.

    Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Malaria Control in Zambia.

    Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, malaria eradication and control, leadership

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. HIV/AIDS in Indonesia: Building a Coordinated National Response. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case documents Indonesia’s progress in developing a coordinated national HIV/AIDS response. Within the context of a new democratic government, a weak civil society sector, a newly decentralized and underfunded public health system, and a religiously conservative environment, the case describes how international donors financed and directed HIV/AIDS-related efforts for the first 15 years of the epidemic. In 2006 the National AIDS Commission (NAC) was restructured and awarded funding from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID). The case documents how DFID’s flexible financing enabled the NAC to develop a single national strategy, a national monitoring and evaluation framework, and a system of local AIDS commissions. The case ends in 2009 with the NAC preparing to assume a new role as one of three Principal Recipients of the Global Fund to Fight, AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The NAC leadership must contemplate how to sustain and further the progress made in scaling up HIV prevention services while taking on new responsibilities as a Global Fund Principal Recipient.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Map of Indonesia Showing HIV Program Implementers, 2005
    Map of Indonesia Showing HIV Program Implementers, 2005. Source: Indonesia National AIDS Commission. (Exhibit 1 "HIV/AIDS in Indonesia: Building a Coordinated National Response" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To understand the impact of external financing, donor-driven agendas, and a national champion in creating a multisectoral response to HIV in a religiously conservative, lower middle-income country.

    Keywords: National strategy, sustainability, HIV prevention, flexible donor financing

    ole‐MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W. Building Local Capacity for Health Commodity Manufacturing: A to Z Textile Mills Ltd. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case focuses on the establishment of the Olyset® Consortium—a public-private partnership that was created to facilitate the manufacture of long-lasting insecticidal bed nets to prevent malaria infection in sub-Saharan Africa—and A to Z Textile Mills (“A to Z”), the manufacturer of the nets in Arusha, Tanzania. The case examines how the public-private partnership was developed, its use of an incentive-based supply chain, A to Z’s business model and impact, and the sustainability of the venture. The case reveals that despite significant success in attaining objectives, the misaligned incentives of the many partners presented major obstacles to the overall sustainability of A to Z’s Olyset® production line.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Long Lasting Insecticide Nets and Olyset Production Process
    Long Lasting Insecticide Nets and Olyset Production Process. Source: A to Z Textile Mills Ltd., Arusha, Tanzania (Case Exhibit 9).

    Learning Objectives: To understand the potential for public-private partnerships to leverage innovation and scalability from the private sector and quality and equitable access from the public sector and to examine the costs and benefits of local manufacturing of technologically complex global health commodities in resource-limited settings.

    Keywords: Public-private partnerships, incentive-based supply chain, global health commodity manufacturing, malaria prevention

    Pabo E, Rhatigan J, Ellner A, Lyon E. HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Hinche, Haiti. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case examines the potential for a non-governmental organization, Zanmi Lasante/Partners in Health (ZL/PIH), to aid in improving voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) services for HIV at a government hospital in Hinche, Haiti. The events of the case begin when the local government official who oversees the hospital invites ZL/PIH to work with the government to improve the hospital’s VCT services. After providing background information on the history of Haiti, on Hinche, and on the state of the current VCT program, the case describes ZL/PIH’s health care delivery model including its management systems, its use of community health workers, and its social programs. It explains how ZL/PIH adapted its mod

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Rainy season on the roads, Central Plateau, Haiti
    Rainy season on the roads, Central Plateau, Haiti; Credit: Evan Lyon

    Learning Objectives: To understand how social, economic and political factors influence health care delivery and to examine effective strategies to address these factors in the design of health care programs.

    Supporting Content: This case has a supplementary summary of history and next steps, titled Two Years in Hinche.

    Keywords: Community-based organizations, HIV prevention, government-NGO partnerships

    Pabo E, Ellner A, Rhatigan J, Lyon E. Two Years in Hinche. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    Two Years in Hinche is a brief supplement to HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Hinche, Haiti. The first case describes an underperforming HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing Program in government run hospital in Hinche, Haiti, and the decision by a government official to invite, Zanmi Lasante/Partners in Health (ZL/PIH), a non governmental organization, to help revamp the program. After a detailed examination of the program and of the ZL/PIH health care delivery model, the case ends with ZL/PIH agreeing to collaborate with the government to revamp the program. This case describes the subsequent steps ZL/PIH took to increase the amount of patients that received HIV counseling and testing by ten-fold, and to begin an HIV treatment program. It details how they were able to adapt their model for the public sector, improve supply chains, integrate staffs, and build community trust.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    VCT Room at Sainte Thérèse Hospital

    Learning Objectives: To examine effective strategies for improving uptake of preventive health services in low-resource settings.

    Supporting Content: This case is the supplement to HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Hinche, Haiti.

    Keywords: Community-based organizations, HIV prevention, government-NGO partnerships

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. loveLife: Preventing HIV Among South African Youth. Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case describes the strategy of the nongovernmental organization (NGO), loveLife, to prevent HIV among South African youth in the face of the world’s largest HIV epidemic, youth culture in post-apartheid South African, and a national government hostile to HIV/AIDS programs. The case traces loveLife from its inception and rapid scale up in 1999 to 2005, when loveLife lost one-third of its operating budget after the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) chose not to renew its second phase of funding. This case documents loveLife’s strategy in scaling up and sustaining delivery of HIV prevention services at scale. A short, optional case coda describes loveLife’s restructuring and positioning after the Global Fund crisis up to 2009.

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    Examples of loveLife media. Source: loveLife.
    Examples of loveLife media. Source: loveLife. (Exhibit 10 from "loveLife: Preventing HIV Among South African Youth" case.)

    Learning Objectives: To learn the application of strategic thinking in HIV prevention using Michael Porter’s “Five Tests of a Good Strategy” and to understand the organizational changes required in transitioning from scaling up to operating at scale.

    Supporting Content: This case has a supplementary summary of history and next steps titled loveLife: preventing HIV among South African youth (Part B). There is also an additional sequel, loveLife: Transitions After 2005.

    Keywords: Demand generation, scale up, sustaining delivery at scale, HIV prevention among youth, strategy, stigma

    Arnquist S, Weintraub R. loveLife: Preventing HIV among South African youth (Part B). Harvard Business Publishing. 2011.Abstract

    This case describes the strategy of the nongovernmental organization (NGO), loveLife, to prevent HIV among South African youth in the face of the world’s largest HIV epidemic, youth culture in post-apartheid South African, and a national government hostile to HIV/AIDS programs. The case traces loveLife from its inception and rapid scale up in 1999 to 2005, when loveLife lost one-third of its operating budget after the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) chose not to renew its second phase of funding. This case documents loveLife’s strategy in scaling up and sustaining delivery of HIV prevention services at scale. A short, optional case coda describes loveLife’s restructuring and positioning after the Global Fund crisis up to 2009. 

    Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

    HIV Incidence among 15-20-year-old South Africans, 2002-2008. Source: Rehle T, Hallett T, Shisana O, et al. A Decline in New HIV Infections in South Africa: Estimating HIV Incidence from Three National HIV Surveys in 2002, 2005 and 2008. PloS one. 2010;5(6):e11094. (Exhibit 2 from "loveLife: preventing HIV among South African youth" case.)
     

     

    Learning Objectives: To learn the application of strategic thinking in HIV prevention using Michael Porter’s “Five Tests of a Good Strategy” and to understand the organizational changes required in transitioning from scaling up to operating at scale.

    Supporting Content: This case is the supplement to loveLife: Preventing HIV Among South African Youth.

    Keywords: Demand generation, scale up, sustaining delivery at scale, HIV prevention among youth, strategy, stigma