Brief Cases

Like our full-length cases, "brief cases" explore important decisions leaders face across health care systems in resource-limited settings, however, they do so in a condensed format. They are 5-8 pages and cover slightly less material. They may be ideal for accelerated or executive education-style courses. Some of our brief cases are originals; others are condensed versions of full-length GHD cases.

Redditt V, ole-MoiYoi K, Rodriguez W, Talbot JR, Weintraub R. Malaria Control in Zambia (Condensed Version). Harvard Business Publishing. 2012.Abstract

The case delves into the history of malaria control efforts in Zambia, including control and treatment policy changes in the in the early 2000s that set Zambia apart from other countries. Because by 2005 Zambia was still falling short of its targets, the National Malaria Control Center (NMCC) resolved to intensify its efforts by developing one national plan to improve coordination, data collection, partner involvement, and ultimately, rapidly scale-up interventions to meet the national malaria targets. The new NMCC director, Dr. Elizabeth Chizema, helped the program achieve success through several key interventions described in the case. With improved monitoring and evaluation, Chizema could demonstrate progress in malaria control, but she worried that partners might lose interest in helping Zambia given the low burden, and the program still had many challenges to overcome. This is a condensed version of the case Malaria Control in Zambia

Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

Malaria Program Scale-up: Coverage and Burden Reduction
Malaria Program Scale-up: Coverage and Burden Reduction. Source: Malaria Control and Evaluation Partnership in Africa. Scaling Up for Impact through Comprehensive Program Improvement. Seattle; 2007. (Exhibit 4a from "Malaria Control in Zambia" case.)

Learning Objectives: To understand the development of a successful malaria control program over time and the components that led to its success including the value of setting bold national goals, the merits of a health system with centralized governance and decentralized implementation, the importance of multiple coordinated interventions as opposed to a "silver bullet" approach for malaria control, and the use of data as an outcome measure, planning tool, and fundraising tool.

Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Malaria Control in Zambia.

Keywords: National strategy, supply chain management, malaria eradication and control, leadership

Chao T, Patel P, Rosenberg J, Riviello R. Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

This case traces the development of surgical and anesthesia services at a rural mission hospital in Kijabe, Kenya. After providing some background of the health system in Kenya, it follows the history of AIC Kijabe Hospital from its founding in 1915 to 2013. The hospital provided high quality surgical services that were supported by many long-term missionary staff members, updated operating theaters, an intensive care unit, and a robust surgical training program. The case describes how the mission of the hospital affects its culture of care provision. It follows the executive director, Mary Muchendu, and her process in turning a mission-focused hospital into a business-focused hospital. The case ends with Muchendu weighing the tradeoffs of providing sustainable growth versus caring for the poor. This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

Surgical Facilities at AIC Kijabe Hospital
Surgical Facilities at AIC Kijabe Hospital: postoperative recovery area with wall oxygen, suction, and vital sign monitoring. Source: Global Health Delivery Case Writers.

Learning Objectives: This case documents the development of a robust surgical program at a mission hospital in rural Kenya, including human resource training and infrastructure improvement. A productive class discussion will allow students to appreciate the factors that allow high-quality surgical care to be delivered in a resource-limited setting; how a mission-driven culture affects a hospital, its sustainability, and the care it provides; what is required to provide high-quality surgical training; and the tensions and tradeoffs between sustainable growth and care for the poor.

Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Surgery at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Rural Kenya

Keywords: Surgical disease, mission-based hospitals, rural surgery services, management, speciality training, global health care delivery, faith based organizations, human resources for health, anesthesia

Arnquist S, Rosenberg J, Weintraub R. The Indus Hospital: Building Surgical Capacity in Pakistan (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

Set in Karachi, Pakistan, this case examines a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting. Within Pakistan's health care system and its political, socioeconomic, and epidemiological context, the case focuses on the Indus Hospital, a charity hospital started in 2007. The case explores the effect of financing, leadership, and a mission-driven culture on health care delivery and the hospital's efforts to provide high-quality care for free to poor patients. It concludes with Indus' leaders planning how to expand their service delivery to include primary and preventative care. This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan

Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic
Indus Hospital Open-Air TB Clinic. Pakistani architect Tariq Quaiser designed the Indus Hospital’s open-air TB clinic with a specialized design that optimized natural ventilation for increased airflow that effectively minimized the spread of disease. Source: Global Health Delivery Project case writers. (Exhibit 7 from "The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan" case.)

Learning Objectives: To understand a private hospital's potential to impact health in a resource-constrained setting, how private financing impacts health care delivery, and the impact of leadership on health care delivery.

Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case The Indus Hospital: Delivering Free Health Care in Pakistan.

Keywords: Human rights, workforce management, sustainability, role of civil society, information systems, organizational culture

Talbot JR, Cole C, May M, Weintraub R. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya (Condensed Version). The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery. 2015.Abstract

This case traces the development of the voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) campaign in Nyanza Province, Kenya as it transformed from the subject of a randomized clinical trial into national policy. After providing some background on the cultural, political, and scientific context surrounding male circumcision, the case traces the PEPFAR-funded implementers' advances in delivering male circumcision in Nyanza. It examines the various delivery models used in Nyanza and the evolution of the relationship between implementers as well as on the development of the national strategic plan for VMMC released in 2009. The case ends with the implementers having come together successfully for two rapid, aggressive, 30-day implementation campaigns and the head of Kenya's National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections Control Programme wrestling with how to make such campaigns sustainable and what lessons from the campaign to pass on to the national program. This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

Teaching Note available through Harvard Business Publishing.

Mobile Service Delivery Model Images
Mobile Service Delivery Model Images. Source: Nyanza Reproductive Health Society. (Exhibit 13 from "Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya" case.)

Learning Objectives: To understand how a randomized controlled trial may be translated into a large-scale public health program; how a surgical campaign was designed and implemented for rapid impact; the role of national and international collaboration in large-scale health delivery; and the ethical tradeoffs that arise in large-scale public health programs.

Supporting Content: This is a condensed version of the case Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Nyanza Province, Kenya.

Keywords: Project management, AIDS, policy, supply and demand, partnerships, strategy, innovation